Small Farm Nation https://smallfarmnation.com Farming | Farm Life | Homesteading | Self-Reliance Sun, 07 Jul 2019 02:00:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.3 Hosted by Tim Young of smallfarmnation.com, this is THE podcast about the business of small-scale family farming and homesteading. Addressing questions such as, how to market and grow your farm business? How to find customers, sell at farmers markets, grow your CSA and build your farm email list? How do you go from having a garden hobby to a farm business? These are just some of the big questions that Tim Young dives into on the Small Farm Nation podcast. The key to realizing your dream of having a successful sustainable farm is first understanding that it's not a hobby...it's a business. And all businesses need customers, which is why farm marketing is so critical. From building your farm brand and email list to selling at farmers markets, launching a CSA or figuring out how to sell to restaurants, each episode will inspire you with farm marketing tips so you can take action to grow your farm business, whether you're already a market gardener, sustainable farmer or a homesteader with farm dreams. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean episodic Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com timlizyoung@gmail.com timlizyoung@gmail.com (Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com) Farming | Farm | Homesteading | Small Farm Nation https://smallfarmnation.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/small-farm-nation-podcast-1.jpghttps://smallfarmnation.com Weekly 7 Habits of Successful Farm Marketershttps://smallfarmnation.com/7-habits-of-successful-farm-marketers/ Sun, 07 Jul 2019 02:00:22 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14441 So what’s the secret to marketing farm and local food products? Today, I’ll tell you, and set you on a solid foundation for marketing your farm and/or food products. Because, if we produce great food and farm products and there’s no one to buy it, what’s the point? So what’s the secret to marketing farm and local food products? Today, I’ll tell you, and set you on a solid foundation for marketing your farm and/or food products.

Now, I know you started your business because you’re passionate about food and farming. But, listen, if we produce great food and farm products and there’s no one to buy it, what’s the point?

And this is what I’m all about at Small Farm Nation and in the Small Farm Nation Academy, helping you become not only a master farmer or craftsperson, but a master marketer as well.  That way, you’ll attract customers, help build a local food community and become financially sustainable.

So let’s get you on the road to you becoming a marketing wiz.

And let’s start this episode with what marketing is not because I know that many people are inherently uncomfortable with marketing and selling.

Perhaps you are as well, but you don’t need to be.

Let me tell you why.

You see, marketing isn’t….

  • Aggressive (used-car) sales tactics
  • Convincing someone to buy something they don’t want or need
  • Advertising, brochures or email
  • A website
  • Creative/graphic design
  • COMPLICATED OR DIFFICULT

Marketing is something YOU can do, and my goal is to help you do it much more effectively.

Now, what marketing is…is the continual process for you to attract and retain loyal customers.

And I want to emphasize the word “attract”, because when a lot of people think of marketing they think “I want to find some customers,” “how do I find customers.”

And I want you to rethink that.

I want you to start with the notion that you build a business where you become a MAGNET for customers.

A magnet for the media, a magnet for the community, a magnet for followers.

You attract people to you, and you achieve that through building a brand, producing content and converting people from strangers into brand advocates.

As I’ve said many times, without customers you have no farm business, right?

You have a hobby…or a compost pile.

Therefore, marketing has to be your most important job. Period. In building your farm, your restaurant, your winery, your cheese or soap business.

This truth applies equally to landscaping, carpentry, professional services or  WHATEVER small business you have.

Marketing is job 1 for the simple reason, no customers, no business.

I mean, don’t get me wrong…weeding, seeding, feeding, breeding…if you’re a baker, kneading, are all important… but marketing is more important to the success of your farm business.

And this is a business, right? We’re not talking about a hobby.

So, since it’s a business it’s about getting and keeping customers.

And listen… YOU CAN DO THIS!

Marketing isn’t the exclusive domain of people who have an MBA in marketing or have a lifetime of experience, I mean, sure, that helps you to understand and be comfortable with what works best, but this is something you can learn yourself.

In fact, you can get your own farm MBA in marketing in my Small Farm Nation Academy, both through lessons I share and from the knowledge sharing that happens in the forums.

Now, one reason I know you can grasp all this is because, food and farm marketing, particularly on the scale we all practice, is ALL about building relationships.

It’s not at all about hard-core sales tactics.

It’s about being yourself and building relationships. But how do you do that?

Well, it starts, believe it or not, with just being yourself. By talking WITH the customer, not AT them. By being conversational.

That will allow you to share your mission…your story, in a way that resonates. And this is where great farm and local food marketing starts. By being open, conversational and sharing your story and mission with PASSION.

It is definitely NOT preaching or talking down to people or telling them why what they’re eating is bad, but inspiring them with WHY you are doing what YOU are doing.

Now, we also need to make it easy for customers to find us. In this day and age it means two things, it means being physically easy to find but also digitally easy to find.

That’s the world of social media and search engine optimization, and you’ll learn all about that in the module on farm web design and elsewhere here on Small Farm Nation.

But we also need to make it easy for customers to buy from us.

That could be anything from having an online store, or accepting credit cards at your farm store or farmers market, or delivering via a CSA or metropolitan buying club.

It could be selling retail cuts of meat versus having to buy a half or whole animal. Just whatever you can to remove the barriers to buying from you.

Remember, while what you’re producing is, I’m sure, far and away better from any industrial alternative, the fact is that the industrial alternatives are far more convenient to buy.

So the more we can do to knock down that barrier, the more attractive you will be to your target customer.

All of these points add up to you being able to attract customers and build relationships.

But, remember, marketing is NOT the goal.

The goal is for…you to achieve customer loyalty and brand preference.

We want customers to seek you out, to ask for you at restaurants and in stores. That’s the goal.

Now, you may be thinking that marketing is complicated and constantly changing, I mean, there’s Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube there’s SnapChat,

I mean, do I have to do ALL these things?

Do I have to do a Facebook Live session?

Look…Tactics and technology change constantly. Heck, I hate to admit it but I remember when fax marketing was a big deal.

And people were doing fax marketing.

Imagine that, getting a promotional fax! Now, who has a fax machine, other than a lawyer or doctor, I guess. Maybe.

So, these tactics and technologies change all the time, and they will continue to do so.

There will be new ways to reach people five years from now that we can’t conceive today.

Now to help you think about this more clearly, I’d like to share what I believe are the 7 Marketing Traits of Highly Successful Farm Businesses. I thought about the characteristics I’ve observed, so let’s see if this can help you.

The first habit I recognize is that customers feel like they personally know the chef, the farmer, the cheese or soap maker, the wine maker.

In fact, they may not know them…PROBABLY don’t know them.

But they feel like they do. That could be because they’ve heard them on podcasts or they’ve read their blog or they’ve seen interviews about them, so they feel like they know them.

I don’t think WholeFoods, CrowdCow or Blue Apron will ever be able to match your ability to do that.

The second habit is that customers share their values and have a vested interest in their success.

That vested interest could be the consumer’s desire to foster a local food community, or a chef’s desire to establish a sense of terroir, or an organization’s mission to abolish GMO food production, or whatever it may be.

But they have a vested interest in that farm’s success. Therefore, they become cheerleaders, which is habit #3. These loyal customers promote the farm business to their friends, co-workers and family.

These loyal customers also help the farms marketing efforts, by actively defending the farm and its values. The fact that customers stand up for the farm is habit # 4.

If someone critiques the farm’s approach on social media, the cheerleaders are there to offer their insightful perspective.

Of course, great food marketers also deliver very professional service, because they know that’s what their customers are used to. That’s habit #5.

They don’t hide behind excuses like, “we’re just farmers” to set low expectations. No…they’re on time for deliveries, they arrive in clean vehicles, they have orders neatly packaged, they’re dressed professionally and not in dirty muck boots.

In short, every experience the customer has is consistent with the image the farm portrays.

And it goes without saying that the business produces excellent quality, whether it’s the appearance and taste of the heirloom tomato or heritage chicken, or the food on the plate at the farm dinner. Superior quality is habit #6.

All this combines to make the customer feel PROUD…very PROUD of their relationship with the farm business.

Would you like to grab a free copy of my the Guide: 7 Marketing Traits of Highly Successful Farms, Learn how profitable farms attract customers, get publicity and command high prices! It’s yours at smallfarmnation.com/habits

When you add up these 7 habits…these traits, these are the traits of great brands.

And I want to close here because I want you to turn your attention, and your concentration, to building a great brand yourself. 

And, listen, you don’t have to be a big company, at all, to build a great local brand.

Sure, you’re building a farm business a food business or whatever, but I want you to focus on building a recognized great brand in your market.

So I’ll be back next week and tell you why it’s so important to build your farm’s brand.


Thanks for Listening!

To help the show:

Thanks for listening. Until next time!

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So what’s the secret to marketing farm and local food products? Today, I’ll tell you, and set you on a solid foundation for marketing your farm and/or food products. Because, if we produce great food and farm products and there’s no one to buy it, smallfarmnation.com So what’s the secret to marketing farm and local food products? Today, I’ll tell you, and set you on a solid foundation for marketing your farm and/or food products. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 12:41
How to Tackle Farm Price Objections: Farm Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-tackle-farm-price-objections/ Sun, 30 Jun 2019 02:00:37 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14399 We all know that sustainably produced food is more expensive than supermarket food, so how do we explain that when challenged? This week I want to discuss a challenge that many small farmers face.  It’s one that they seem to all dread and it puts them on the defensive. It’s the whole issue of defending why their products cost so much. Or, at least seems to cost so much. Now, this is a real issue for many of us, so it’s not one we should run from. We need to be prepared to face this head on, and the better you get at this, the more it will become a non-issue. Why is that? Because, as your skill improves at conveying value, that skill will permeate all aspects of your marketing. Your blog posts, your social media updates, what you say on your website and in your email marketing. You’ll become proficient at conveying value and focusing on benefits, rather than being defensive. Before we dive in, I want you to understand something. The Dollar Store shopper isn’t your farm's customer. Or at least not for most of you. You’re not running blue light specials. I want you to understand that price objection is a good sign because it’s usually a buying signal. The prospective customer wants to buy but needs to rationalize this objection. And it’s your job to help them do just that. And in this episode, I explain how to do that. Validate with empathy. Normalize the objection. Paint a farm picture. Sell value. So here’s how it works with my director’s commentary, so to speak: The customer says, why is the chicken so expensive? “You’re right. If you’re comparing the price of our chicken to a chicken in a supermarket it seems ours costs more.” (I validated with empathy. But notice I used the word “seems.” It seems ours costs more. That’s to implant a subliminal message that perhaps the cost isn’t more. Now I want to normalize the objection, so I continue.) “And you know, I had two customers on a recent farm tour who were concerned about the price at first, just as you are now.” (now to paint a farm picture) So I walked them to the brood house and let them see the baby chicks. While we were there, they watched me fill their feeders, by hand, and check their water. We then walked out to the pasture and saw the chickens scratching for bugs in their chicken tractors. I explained how my wife and I built those tractors ourselves, and showed how we pulled them forward every day. I let one of the customers try and pull the tractor forward but she wasn’t quite ready for the workout. But it gave her a real sense of two things. The physical effort we put into raising these birds by hand, and the utter enjoyment these birds feel by soaking up sun, scratching earth and chasing insects. (this is me painting a vivid picture. Now I need to sell value). Like you, I couldn’t understand why good food cost more when I first started out. But it all makes sense for me now.  I mean, a handcrafted knife is more valued and more costly to produce than a mass-produced one, right? Therefore, it costs more. Likewise, our chickens are hand fed, hand watered and hand processed on farm by our family. It’s a handcrafted, ethical product from start to finish. So of course it costs more than a supermarket chicken, but it’s not remotely the same product.  And I strongly feel that a chicken deserves a chance to be a chicken. Don’t you? And this is where you stay silent. Which, let’s face it…can be really hard. But do it. Stay silent and let the customer respond when you say, “don’t you?” So, here’s the whole conversation again, without any commentary on my part. The customer says, why is the chicken so expensive? “You’re right. If you’re comparing the price of our chicken to a chicken in a supermarket it seems ours cost more.” “And you know, I had two customers on a recent farm tour who were concerned about the price at first, just as you are now.” So I walked them to the brood house and let them see the baby chicks. We all know that sustainably produced food is more expensive than supermarket food, so how do we explain that when challenged?

This week I want to discuss a challenge that many small farmers face.  It’s one that they seem to all dread and it puts them on the defensive.

It’s the whole issue of defending why their products cost so much. Or, at least seems to cost so much.

Now, this is a real issue for many of us, so it’s not one we should run from. We need to be prepared to face this head on, and the better you get at this, the more it will become a non-issue.

Why is that?

Because, as your skill improves at conveying value, that skill will permeate all aspects of your marketing.

Your blog posts, your social media updates, what you say on your website and in your email marketing.

You’ll become proficient at conveying value and focusing on benefits, rather than being defensive.

Before we dive in, I want you to understand something.

The Dollar Store shopper isn’t your farm’s customer. Or at least not for most of you. You’re not running blue light specials.

I want you to understand that price objection is a good sign because it’s usually a buying signal.

The prospective customer wants to buy but needs to rationalize this objection.

And it’s your job to help them do just that.

And in this episode, I explain how to do that.

  1. Validate with empathy.
  2. Normalize the objection.
  3. Paint a farm picture.
  4. Sell value.

So here’s how it works with my director’s commentary, so to speak:

The customer says, why is the chicken so expensive?

“You’re right. If you’re comparing the price of our chicken to a chicken in a supermarket it seems ours costs more.” (I validated with empathy. But notice I used the word “seems.” It seems ours costs more. That’s to implant a subliminal message that perhaps the cost isn’t more. Now I want to normalize the objection, so I continue.)

“And you know, I had two customers on a recent farm tour who were concerned about the price at first, just as you are now.” (now to paint a farm picture)

So I walked them to the brood house and let them see the baby chicks. While we were there, they watched me fill their feeders, by hand, and check their water.

We then walked out to the pasture and saw the chickens scratching for bugs in their chicken tractors.

I explained how my wife and I built those tractors ourselves, and showed how we pulled them forward every day. I let one of the customers try and pull the tractor forward but she wasn’t quite ready for the workout.

But it gave her a real sense of two things.

The physical effort we put into raising these birds by hand, and the utter enjoyment these birds feel by soaking up sun, scratching earth and chasing insects. (this is me painting a vivid picture. Now I need to sell value).

Like you, I couldn’t understand why good food cost more when I first started out. But it all makes sense for me now.  I mean, a handcrafted knife is more valued and more costly to produce than a mass-produced one, right? Therefore, it costs more. Likewise, our chickens are hand fed, hand watered and hand processed on farm by our family.

It’s a handcrafted, ethical product from start to finish. So of course it costs more than a supermarket chicken, but it’s not remotely the same product.  And I strongly feel that a chicken deserves a chance to be a chicken.

Don’t you?

And this is where you stay silent.

Which, let’s face it…can be really hard.

But do it. Stay silent and let the customer respond when you say, “don’t you?”

So, here’s the whole conversation again, without any commentary on my part.

The customer says, why is the chicken so expensive?

“You’re right. If you’re comparing the price of our chicken to a chicken in a supermarket it seems ours cost more.”

“And you know, I had two customers on a recent farm tour who were concerned about the price at first, just as you are now.”

So I walked them to the brood house and let them see the baby chicks. While we were there, they watched me fill their feeders, by hand, and check their water.

We then walked out to the pasture and saw the chickens scratching for bugs in their chicken tractors.

I explained how my wife and I built those tractors ourselves, and showed how we pulled them forward every day. I let one of the customers try and pull the tractor forward but she wasn’t quite ready for the workout.

But it gave her a real sense of two things.

The physical effort we put into raising these birds by hand, and the utter enjoyment these birds feel by soaking up sun, scratching earth and chasing insects.

Like you, I couldn’t understand why good food cost more when I first started out. But it all makes sense for me now.  I mean, a handcrafted knife is more valued and more costly to produce than a mass-produced one, right? Therefore, it costs more. Likewise, our chickens are hand fed, hand watered and hand processed on farm by our family.

It’s a handcrafted, ethical product from start to finish. So of course it costs more than a supermarket chicken, but it’s not remotely the same product.  And I strongly feel that a chicken deserves a chance to be a chicken.

Don’t you?

Don’t forget to join us in the Small Farm Nation Academy.

Thanks for Listening!

To help the show:

Thanks for listening. Until next time!

 

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We all know that sustainably produced food is more expensive than supermarket food, so how do we explain that when challenged? This week I want to discuss a challenge that many small farmers face.  It’s one that they seem to all dread and it puts them... Free farm marketing training at smallfarmnation.com We all know that sustainably produced food is more expensive than supermarket food, so how do we explain that when challenged?<br /> <br /> This week I want to discuss a challenge that many small farmers face.  It’s one that they seem to all dread and it puts them on the defensive.<br /> <br /> It’s the whole issue of defending why their products cost so much. Or, at least seems to cost so much.<br /> <br /> Now, this is a real issue for many of us, so it’s not one we should run from. We need to be prepared to face this head on, and the better you get at this, the more it will become a non-issue.<br /> <br /> Why is that?<br /> <br /> Because, as your skill improves at conveying value, that skill will permeate all aspects of your marketing.<br /> <br /> Your blog posts, your social media updates, what you say on your website and in your email marketing.<br /> <br /> You’ll become proficient at conveying value and focusing on benefits, rather than being defensive.<br /> <br /> Before we dive in, I want you to understand something.<br /> <br /> The Dollar Store shopper isn’t your farm's customer. Or at least not for most of you. You’re not running blue light specials.<br /> <br /> I want you to understand that price objection is a good sign because it’s usually a buying signal.<br /> <br /> The prospective customer wants to buy but needs to rationalize this objection.<br /> <br /> And it’s your job to help them do just that.<br /> <br /> And in this episode, I explain how to do that. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 14:01
How to Grow Your Farm’s Email List: Farm Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-grow-your-farms-email-list/ Sun, 23 Jun 2019 02:00:51 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14394 An email list is your most important communication asset, and email marketing is a great way to sell your farm products. But how do you build a list in the first place? In this episode I walk you through the four not-so-simple steps of email list building for your farm business. Email marketing is a great way to sell your farm products, but how do you build a list in the first place? In this episode I walk you through the four not-so-simple steps of email list building for your farm business.

You’ve heard it many times, but an email list is your most important communication asset. It’s the best way for you to control getting a message directly to your customers.

But most farm websites do an awful job of list building.

I mean, list building comes down to four simple steps.

  1. have a place to capture emails.
  2. drive traffic to that place
  3. give people a great reason to sign-up
  4. give subscribers a way and reason to share

Of course, successful list building is much more detailed than that and requires tools and know how.

I just covered all this in an 11-video course on list building. That was released to the Small Farm Nation Academy just this month.

But what you can do now to review how you’re doing with those four steps?

The first step to building your email list is to have a place to capture emails. Of course, that means being on your website.

Do you have one? An opt-in form? If you don’t, that’s a problem. So create one, right away.

But even if you do, does it stand out? Does it have great contrast with the rest of the page?  Is it located above the fold and also at the top of the sidebar, if you have one, and at the bottom of blog posts?

That’s important, because the three rules of list building are to ask for the email, ask again and then to ask again.

Keep asking! So make sure that opt-in box is visible on your website.

But not just on your website.

Make sure there’s a “sign-up” button on your Facebook page so people are driven to the opt-in form that way.

The second step to building your email list is to drive traffic to your opt-in form.

Sounds easy, right? Just drive traffic to your website. But how do you do that? I mean, that’s probably one of your challenges, right? Getting enough people to your site.

Ok, so you’ve basically got two macro options.

You either have to 1) buy traffic or you have to 2) earn traffic

Now, buying cold traffic, or traffic from people who aren’t yet familiar with you, means advertising. That’s PPC advertising on Google, Facebook or elsewhere.

There aren’t too many scenarios I can think of where I’d recommend buying PPC traffic on Google.

And, while I am a fan of Facebook ads, you shouldn’t just throw money at that without having clearly defined goals and sales funnels set up, and automated. I have a course on how to do all that inside the Small Farm Nation Academy.

So let me give you 10 quick tips on how you can drive traffic to your site.

  1. The first is fully optimizing technical and on-page SEO. I’m not sure why so many farm sites fail to do this, but it’s hugely important to being found. And let’s face it, most people find things by Googling them. Academy members can check out my video lessons on search engine optimization, but if you’re not a member of the Small Farm Nation Academy, just research SEO and get both your site and your specific pages optimized.
  2. Tip two is to blog. Your blog posts shouldn’t be what you want to write about. Rather, they should start with the end in mind. Who are you trying to reach, and what do you want that person to do once they read your blog post? That will help you to create a catchy headline and to optimize the right keywords in the post so that your post is found, and read.
  3. Tip three is guest blogging. Now, many of you will cringe at this because you’re already struggling with what to blog about on your own site. But one of the keys to SEO is getting backlinks, and a great way to do that is to blog for another site. Maybe restaurants you’d like to target have blogs? Or maybe local natural health practitioners do? They both serve audiences who would be interested in what you have, so why not offer to write a blog post for each of them? You’ll get backlinks, reach a new audience and perhaps get a new restaurant customer at the same time. Boom!
  4. Tip four is similar to tip three, but instead of guest blogging, offer to be a guest on a podcast. This is much easier in that you just have to show up and talk. Hell, I love to talk…just ask me something 🙂 And it’s a great way to convey your passion for what you’re doing as, let’s face it, vocal emphasis is often lost on the digital screen. So look for podcasts that make sense for you. You’ll get backlinks to your site as well in the show notes. Sweet!
  5. Tip five is email marketing, but that’s the point of all this, right? I mean, you need a list to email to. But this is the reason you need a list, because most people who visit a website never return unless given a reason. And the best way to drive them back is to email them a link. So, if you have a list at all, drive people to your site, your blog posts and your special offers.
  6. Tip number six here is to promote events. Maybe you want to create Easter egg hunts on your farm, or a farm dinner, or whatever. Create the event and list it on your site, of course. But also list and promote the event on Facebook, as well as with relevant newspapers, online community sites and so on. Lots of sites have event calendars, so get yours listed. Again, you’ll get backlinks and you’ll get exposure.
  7. Okay, tip number seven here is a good one. Create a viral giveaway using tool like KingSumo.  Now, normally when you do a giveaway, when someone enters the giveaway, they have only one entry. But tools like KingSumo are different. They create an incentive for people to not only enter, but to share and promote the contest on social media. How? Because when they refer, lets say, 3 friends to enter the giveaway with their unique link, they receive 3 more entries, thus INCREASING their chances at winning. And for every new email sign up that they refer, they get 3 (or whatever number you choose) additional entries into the contest. So they dramatically increase their chances of winning by sharing it with their friends and telling them to sign up. Visualize this. Imagine that one person refers 3 new people, who each refer 3 more people, each referring 3 more people. All of the sudden, that one single email subscriber just turned into 48 email subscribers. So you can add a LOT of subscribers to your list quickly. A word of caution though, because many of these subscribers may not be qualified as likely customers for you, right? And you don’t want a big list of people who will never buy from you. So, you can qualify them by how you choose what prize to promote. For instance, if it was half a lamb that had to be picked up locally, you wouldn’t be getting entrants from the other side of the world.
  8. Tip number 8 to drive traffic to your site is to use social hash tags. You see them all the time on Facebook and Twitter…you know, #endfactoryfarming or what not. Now, don’t get your hopes up about this, but maybe you’ll come up with something catchy that will drive people to your site.
  9. Tip number 9 is to engage online in groups and blogs, or even to comment on relevant newspaper articles. There are a ton of Facebook groups that you can engage in, but carefully choose those that represent your target audience. In other words, don’t promote yourself in those farm Facebook groups, because those are your peers, not your customers. Go where you customers are.
  10. Finally, tip number 10 of how you can drive people to your site is to speak at conference or event. This can be an organic conference, a real food event or a local social club, such as Chamber of Commerce. Just take an hour or two, get out there and press the flesh.

Okay, so there are 10 great tips on how you can drive traffic to your site.

Let’s move on with the next two steps to list building.

The third step to building your email list is to give people a great reason to sign-up.

This is where so many people struggle, as they try to come up with a great idea for the illusive lead magnet.

A lead magnet is just a resource that the visitor wants and is willing to exchange an email address to get. It started out years ago as an e-book, but nowadays is more often a one or two page checklist, recipe, guide or cheat sheet.

For instance, one of my best performing lead magnets is the 7 Marketing Traits of Highly Successful Farms.

That lead magnet works for me because my target audience is small-scale farmers, and many of them want to know what is working, from a marketing perspective, with other farms.

The question you’ll have to answer is what does your target audience want. It could be recipes, it could be how-to guides, such as how to make salami or how to make cheese at home.

Or it could be that they just want to be first on the list when you have an opening in your CSA or whatever.

Many times you do NOT need a lead magnet. Many times people just want to be notified. I mean, you don’t see Apple offering a lead magnet on their site do you? But people sign up because they want to be notified when something’s new.

This taps into a very important marketing dynamic called the Fear of Missing Out, or FOMO. And you can tap into it as well, as I often did on my farm.

How?

heritage turkeysWell, we only raised so many heritage turkeys. We only produced so many Ossabaw pigs. 

So, if people wanted to be notified when they were offered so they’d have a chance to get them, they had to be on the list.

And that’s one of the reasons we built a list of over 5,000 subscribers. Because almost everyone has FOMO, or a fear of missing out. So create a lead magnet if you feel it’s best for you, but you don’t have to.

You can leverage the innate fear of missing out to your advantage as well to get people to sign up.

Now, I’ll tell you this.

Regardless of whether you focus on lead magnets of FOMO marketing, you’re not going to convert many visitors into subscribers if you don’t optimize your calls to action.

I’m not talking about the offer here. I’m talking about that SUBSCRIBE button.

It’s really important where it’s located, how it contrasts with the rest of the screen and what words you use on the button. Using words like subscribe or enter are generally not the best.

I cover all this in my list building course inside the Small Farm Nation Academy.

You gotta make sure that button and the entire call to action form pop on the site so that the eyes are drawn to it, and that the copy lures the visitor into becoming a subscriber.

Okay, so that’s the third step of how you get people to actually sign up.

The fourth and final step is to give people a way and a reason to share.

So how do you do that?

A big mistake almost 100% of farm sites make…and most other sites, come to think of it, is they overlook the single most important step in list building.

And that is to create a thank you page.

Here’s what I mean.

Normally when you subscribe to an email list, particularly on farm sites, you get something that says “you’ve subscribed” or “thanks for subscribing.”

Sometimes you get nothing, sometimes you’re redirected to the home page, sometimes you just get a blank screen.

I’ve seen it many times.

Here’s what should happen.

You should be redirected to a thank you page.

Again, go to https://smallfarmnation.com/habits/ and download the 7 Marketing Traits of Highly Successful farms guide to see what I mean. Once you subscribe, you’ll be redirected to a thank you page.

Now, why is the thank you page so important?

Pay attention here because this is really important.

The Thank You page is the ONLY page that you’re guaranteed 100% of your subscribers will see. The only one.

Because, and you know this, even when people subscribe many of them don’t see the confirmation email, right?

It goes in a SPAM or promotional folder, or they delete it by mistake. That’s why you have people in a double opt-in email system who never confirm.

But your thank you page can not only fix that for them, it can further engage them in a relationship with you. And if you set it up right, it can give them both a way and a reason to share your page with others.

Listen in as I guide you through how to grow your farm’s email list!

Thanks for Listening!

To help the show:

Thanks for listening. Until next time!

 

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An email list is your most important communication asset, and email marketing is a great way to sell your farm products. But how do you build a list in the first place? - In this episode I walk you through the four not-so-simple steps of email list b... FREE farm marketing training at smallfarmnation.com - Email marketing is a great way to sell your farm products, but how do you build a list in the first place? In this episode I walk you through the four not-so-simple steps of email list building for your farm business.<br /> <br /> You’ve heard it many times, but an email list is your most important communication asset. It’s the best way for you to control getting a message directly to your customers.<br /> <br /> But most farm websites do an awful job of list building.<br /> <br /> I mean, list building comes down to four simple steps.<br /> <br /> have a place to capture emails.<br /> drive traffic to that place<br /> give people a great reason to sign-up<br /> give subscribers a way and reason to share<br /> Of course, successful list building is much more detailed than that and requires tools and know how.<br /> <br /> I just covered all this in an 11-video course on list building. That was released to the Small Farm Nation Academy just this month.<br /> <br /> But what you can do now to review how you’re doing with those four steps?<br /> <br /> Listen in as I guide you through how to grow your farm's email list! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 20:16
Why Small Farms Fail: Farm Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/why-family-farms-fail-farm-podcast/ Sun, 16 Jun 2019 02:00:36 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14387 Small businesses routinely fail in every industry segment, but what   causes small farms to fail? In this episode I share 7 reasons why small farms fail, so you learn what not to do so that your farm thrives. I'll walk you through seven reasons why small farms fail. Small businesses routinely fail in every industry segment, but what causes small farms to fail? In this episode I share 7 reasons why small farms fail, so you learn what not to do so that your farm thrives.

So, starting a business is a risky venture, right? And it doesn’t really matter what sector you start a business in.

If you start a restaurant, and insurance or law practice, a car wash or even a marketing agency, there’s a pretty high probability that you’re gonna fail.

That’s just a fact. But let’s just examine the reasons why these businesses fail. And actually, the agriculture sector has a much lower failure rate after 5 years than most industries.

For example, 50 or more of agriculture businesses are still going after five years, whereas only about 36 of construction businesses make it the long.

So the perception that some have that there’s a high failure rate in small farms isn’t born out by the data.

And one of the reasons that many farming businesses make it that long and go much longer is because they’re subsidized.

Not by the government. But by the farmer, who is most often working a second job so that the farm can work.

And that’s cool if that’s what you want to do. But, again, that’s more of a hobby farm and not really a farming business.

And the point of this episode is to discuss why farming businesses fail and what you can learn from those mistakes.

So let’s get right into them.

Here’s reason number one that small farms fail.

1) They approach it as a lifestyle and not as a business

You see, many people are attracted to farming because they love the notion of the lifestyle. They want to farm or grow produce. Or have a collection of animals, and they want to spend their days in the sunshine, producing something with their hands and being out on the land.

And that’s great.

But is that how you would approach a business opportunityIs that the opportunity you’d pitch to an investor or a bank?…that you want to go work with your hands in the soil and have some animals?

Of course not!

Because a business approach means identifying the market first.

And that’s very different from what most farmers do, who start simply because they want to grow things. Or produce things like soap, herbs and cheese.

So they treat selling and marketing as an afterthought.

Now, as I’ve said many times, that’s a mistake.

A business is a business because it has customers that buy from it.

So you always start with the market in mind.

There’s an excellent publication for small farmers called “Growing for Market
and the title means just that…produce what the market will buy and that you can sell.

And sell at an attractive profit margin. That means focusing on high-value crops and products.

For me, that was artisan cheese, raw milk and grassfed beef. For you, it may mean cut flowers, herbs, soaps or what not.

But there are many farm enterprises that aren’t high margin or high value, and that leads me into the second reason why small farms fail.

2) Reason number two is that they choose low-end profit streams

In these cases, the math just doesn’t work, because the farmer chose either a low margin product or is targeting a very cost-conscious consumer.

And while Wal-Mart can pull off that strategy…at least until Amazon buries them…that’s only because they achieved enormous scale, efficiency and supply chain integration.

Those aren’t benefits you’re likely to achieve as a small farmer.

So it’s really difficult in small-scale farming to make it on the price dimension and, let’s be honest here, there’s no business opportunity selling to people who don’t have money.

Just. A. Fact.

So target opportunities with segments who do have disposable income. And select farm enterprises that don’t have such a low barrier to entry.

Because if you choose something that’s easy and cheap to get into, even if you achieve some level of success, it won’t be difficult for others to emulate.

So it’s imperative for any small business to choose a business model focused on high-profit margin enterprises that target customers who have the means and willingness to purchase what you’re offering.

And that’s doubly important for farmers.

But how do you know if you’re producing a high margin farm product?

That leads straight into the third reason.

3) Reason number three that small farms fail is poor/non-existent accounting

Look…as farmer…or entrepreneur, you must wear many hats We all know that. And it can be overwhelming at times…hell it is overwhelming, all the time.

Ideally, you have an accounting background or can hire an accountant, but let’s face it. Most small farm businesses don’t. They may rely on a CPA for occasional help…like yearly taxes, but the day to day accounting falls in their own laps

Too often, they don’t know what to do, so accounting is just as much an afterthought as marketing is. They don’t set up proper systems for measuring everything and properly allocating overhead or fixed expenses.

They just buy the feed, buy the seed, get to work, go to market and hope they have money at the end of the month.

You know it’s true.

So the farmpreneur doesn’t know what the real cost of production is, what the real fully-allocated profit margins are by product line, by customer segment, by go to market approach and so on.

They don’t know where they should be investing more, and where they should cut back. So the numbers are bad.  And with bad numbers or no numbers, you’re flying blind.

heritage turkeyFor instance, I’ve mentioned before that we used to raise lots of heritage turkeys for the Thanksgiving market. And while that was a good entree into our other farm products, it was a pretty poor business.

Turkey poults are expensive, there’s a reasonably high mortality rate, particularly on pasture. There’s the brooding, feeding and daily care for 6-8 months before you get paid, and when you do, it doesn’t come close to an attractive margin.

We “convince ourselves” that it covers our costs…but it doesn’t. Not when you factor in the land cost, the opportunity cost and the sheer time it takes.

We get emotionally attached to these enterprises because let’s face it…we enjoy it. We like the work.

But if you had an accounting push an analysis in front of you that showed how much money you were losing for all the time you put in…and how much you could be earning if you focused instead on another enterprise…you’d make the switch in a hurry.

And that’s what good, solid accounting can give you.

So don’t make that mistake. Know your numbers in detail from day one.

Okay, let’s move on to the fourth and probably biggest reason small farms fail. It’s the same reason any small business fails.

4) And that is that it’s undercapitalized from the start

It lacks a cash cushion.

Now, this is the reason WHY you need attractive profit margins.  Why you MUST have attractive profit marginsBecause there’s a cyclical nature to business.

All businesses.

If you think your farm is recession proof, you haven’t been through a real recession. 

But even if there’s not a recession bad things can and will happen over time…

You suffer the loss of a key restaurant or distributor.

Or, there’s the entrance of a new competitor that creates price pressure or forces additional advertising investments.

Or the filing of a lawsuit because someone got injured or sick.

Believe me, I know…I’ve run businesses where we had to settle lawsuits for absolute false claims. But it was cheaper than going through the process.

This stuff happens…particularly in this country.

And these things happen in any business, so a business has to amass enough earnings over time to weather these storms.

And beyond business cycles, farming is impacted by drought, disease, storms, and other calamities.

Now, I know many people want to get into farming and they don’t have much money. Okay, I get it. I hear you.

But farming is a business like any other, and if you expect to be successful in any business, you’ve got to have operating capital and cash reserves.

If you don’t have it, get it! Don’t complain about it…we’re all adults, here. If you don’t have money, get out and earn some and save it first.

You’re gonna need it.

Let’s move on.

5) Reason number 5 that small farms fail is lack of focus or trying to do too much

Now, I find that this is rather unique to farming.

With other businesses I’ve started and run you tend to be laser focused. I built a high-tech marketing agency that was focused squarely on offering a certain set of services to mid to large B2B tech firms. Very focused!

My wife and I also had a gourmet online fudge business for a brief period of time, but we didn’t try to make anything other than fudge. That was the business…and it was killer fudge.

But with farming, it’s not only easy to venture into countless enterprises…it’s almost like a drug.

With livestock, you get some chickens then rationalize adding pigs, cows, sheep, goats, rabbits…even donkeys and geese to the mix.

Before you know it…you’ve got a petting zoo. Only you’re not operating a petting zoo, are you?

This goes back to the accounting issue of not knowing what’s profitable and what’s not, but also to not treating the farm as a business.

Not starting with the market in mind. Now, the reason farms often make this mistake of trying to do too much is the next reason why they fail.

6) And reason number 6 is that they try to emulate other farm’s success without understanding why they’re successful AND whether it can be replicated

I’ve discussed this before and the best example I know to illustrate this point is Joel Salatin at Polyface.

As you know, Joel is a very popular proponent of small-scale sustainable agriculture. He and his farm are featured in pretty much any documentary on food choices and industrial agriculture. He’s a prolific, opinionated and inspiring author. He speaks frequently at conferences and events, and his farm doors are open, so to speak, so countless people visit his farm.

And fall in love with what he’s accomplished.

So, starry-eyed, they rush back to emulate his model. And some do a fine job of pulling it off.

But most don’t.

At best, they struggle and wonder why Polyface can get customers and run a profitable farm, but they can’t. At worst, they give up after a year or two and say it doesn’t work.

In other words, they don’t understand why the model they’re trying to emulate worked in the first place.

In my view, the Polyface model works today for three reasons.

Polyface has achieved scale. They don’t produce 100 chickens a year. They produce well over 20,000.  20,000 is the maximum you can do on a single farm, at least under the PL90-492 exemption, so they lease other farms.

And they don’t have 10 cows. They have over 1,000. So that’s a sizable grassfed beef operation.

So if you’re going to set out to replicate some of that success understand you’ll need scale too, and that also means not being distracted by too many farming enterprises.

I’ve already discussed that as a reason why farms fail.

Now, their scale leads to another reason they’re successful.

They’re VERY efficient! They process chickens faster, cheaper and more efficiently than the rest of us, they handle chores more efficiently than the rest of us and they serve more customers more efficiently than the rest of us.

But this is all a result of the scale they’ve achieved.

Finally, and I know I’ve said this before, they’re successful because of the wonderful success Joel has had branding his farm. He’s an innately effective marketer.

So if you’re gonna get inspired and go out and attempt to emulate that model, ask yourself…can you achieve scale, efficiency and the branding that they have?

Or if you’re modeling after someone else, do you really understand their success drivers and can you replicate that?

Now, there’s another reason too that Polyface is successful. And it’s easy to look at Polyface today and say, wow, I’d like to have a farm like that.

But we’re looking at the “after picture.”

The “before picture” was a lot of years scraping by, not incurring debt and tirelessly evangelizing about the farm’s practices.

Okay, let’s move on to reason number 7 why farms fail.

7) They make marketing an afterthought.

And they make two big mistakes in this regard.

First, they simply don’t prioritize marketing until they have product to sell and they fail to understand how critical it is to build a strong brand for their farm

And as I said in a previous post the time to start marketing your farm is BEFORE you start farmingGo back and listen to that episode if you want to understand why.

Now, the second mistake related to marketing is this, and it’s commonplace.

When they do start marketing their ideology gets in the way.

They get so caught up in all their personal beliefs and values that they let that drive their marketing. You know what I’m talking about.

They say GMO is bad, industrial food will make you sick, CAFOs are horrific.

It’s not only copycat language that we see everywhere that does nothing to differentiate the farm, but it’s fear-based negative language.

And fear is not a good way to get people to buy your products…telling them that industrial food will make them sick or is bad for them…that won’t work for most people.

And this is a problem not just on farm websites. I see it all the time on Facebook, often when a farmer posts a link to an article and then goes into a diatribe about all that’s wrong with the world.

That doesn’t exactly inspire, does it?

Imagine if the world’s great marketers, such as Apple did that. Instead of showing you all the amazing things they’re products can do for you…and that you can do with them…that they talked only about how you’ll have dropped calls with other solutions.

Or you’ll have to carry a separate camera and that’s a hassle. Or that you’ll need a paper map instead of their GPS.

They don’t hammer on that stuff. They show you the life you can have…the joy and convenience you can have if you buy their products.

So there’s WAY too much negative language in the world of sustainable farming, but…this creates an opportunity for you to be different.

Instead of emphasizing what’s wrong with the world,  focus on why you farm the way you do and the joy, health, and connection your customers can realize if they support you.

Show them with pictures, tell them with emotive, positive words. Because most farmers aren’t doing this.

So the good news is that if you can market positively…with a vision for positive solutions and change, it’ll be music to people’s ears, and it will differentiate you as a farmer.

This episode will help you understand why farming businesses fail and what you can learn from those mistakes.

Listen in as I give you food for thought on how to make sure your farming business is one that will thrive!

Thanks for Listening!

To help the show:

Thanks for listening. Until next time!

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Small businesses routinely fail in every industry segment, but what   causes small farms to fail? In this episode I share 7 reasons why small farms fail, so you learn what not to do so that your farm thrives. - FREE farm marketing course at smallfarmnation.com<br /> Small businesses routinely fail in every industry segment, but what   causes small farms to fail? In this episode I share 7 reasons why small farms fail, so you learn what not to do so that your farm thrives.<br /> <br /> I'll walk you through seven reasons why small farms fail. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 21:12
Is your farm a money-sucking hobby or a profitable business?https://smallfarmnation.com/is-your-farm-a-money-sucking-hobby-or-a-profitable-business/ Sun, 09 Jun 2019 02:00:12 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14383 The phrase hobby farm is cute and all, but what’s the difference between a hobby farm and a farming business? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you might have a farm hobby that costs you money rather than a thriving farm business that earns you money. The phrase hobby farm is cute and all, but what’s the difference between a hobby farm and a farming business? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you might have a farm hobby that costs you money rather than a thriving farm business that earns you money.

So, this topic of understanding the difference between farm hobbies and farm businesses is very important.

It’s an issue I’ve see often with small farmers, as they seem to operate partly as a farm business and partly…or mainly, I should say,…as a hobby farm.

And I understand why this happens when people opt out of other careers for farm life.

What draws them is the idea of working on the land. Of having animals…livestock. Of tending sheep or chickens, collecting eggs, planting seeds, harvesting crops. Of growing food under blue skies to the soothing sounds of birds and bees rather than grating sounds of traffic and ambulances.

And those are all great reasons to embrace farm life.

But, notice I didn’t mention anything about finances? About customers? Because folks are rarely lured into this lifestyle by thoughts of, “I’ve got an idea of how to make a boatload of money farming.”

So, it’s generally not the business plans or finances that lures them to these businesses.

And that’s a shame, because, as you yourself may already know, these ARE businesses.  And they’re not immune to the laws of business. Namely, they need customers and a sales price that far exceeds the production cost.

And, that’s how they would approach any other business, right?

I mean, if someone was stuck in a soul-sucking cubicle job and wanted out, and if they stumbled across an opportunity to start a dry-cleaning operation, wouldn’t they assess it as a business?

They wouldn’t daydream about folding clothes and cleaning suits.

No, they’d assess the business model, get confident with their profit projections and marketing strategy before pulling the trigger on the business.

But this is where farming is different than most businesses.

Not all, because, I know just as many people who have started restaurants, because the love to cook, as those who started farming, because they love to garden.

But just because you can cook doesn’t remotely mean you can run a profitable restaurant.

And ditto for farming.

So the first question you have to ask yourself is do you have a farm business or a farm hobby?

Or if you haven’t started yet, are you committed to having a farm business, or a farm hobby?

Stated differently, will you garden and homestead or will you farm?

If you’re not sure of the difference, here’s one way you can tell.

  • If you’re producing something for YOUR consumption, then you’re either gardening or homesteading.
  • But if you’re producing something for others, then you’re FARMING.

And that “producing something” doesn’t have to be food.

It can be soap, fiber or animal feed. Something produced from the land—-that’s the defining characteristic of a farming business.

Now, if you left a job to become a farmer, you’d tell people that you’re going to farm, wouldn’t you?

Your friends and family would think you went to start a farm, right?

But is that true?

NO!

Because you need this enterprise to MAKE MONEY, don’t you.

And that means it’s a business.

It means, like it or not, that you’re an entrepreneur.

So you must accept the fact that you own a farm BUSINESS or you’re planning on starting a farm business.

And what’s the one thing that EVERY business needs?

CUSTOMERS.

Because customers are the difference between a business and a hobby.

That’s basically what defines a business, isn’t it.

But, the thing is, I still find a lot of people who behave as if their farm business was a hobby.

They focus on chores more than marketing and the “business” struggles to make a difference or achieve the owner’s desires.

I mean, they get up in the morning and dive into farm chores first thing.

They don’t stop to ask if this is the most important STRATEGIC use of their time, or if they’d be better off blocking out two hours to create emails and blog posts.

No…they wake up, weed, feed, seed and operate with the if I build it they will come mentality.

And, most often, they (the customers) don’t come.

So ask yourself…do YOU think of your farm as a business or a hobby?

Here’s how you know if it’s a hobby rather than a business.

When it’s a hobby, you think, what do I want to grow? Or, what do I WANT my garden beds to look like?

You think, look how cute those goats/chicks are…I want one! Or ten!

And I want to build a cute little brood house to hatch the chicks.

You think, I can’t wait to browse the new seed catalog!

But when it’s a business and you’re the entrepreneur, you think differently.

The questions you ask yourself all relate to strategy and profitability.

Questions like:

  • what is my vision for the farm business?
  • what products will I make or produce?
  • why did I choose those? was it profit margins? competitive uniqueness?
  • What do my garden beds NEED to be like to maximize efficiency?
  • Who will I sell my farm products to?
  • How will I go to market and sell my products?
  • Who else makes these products or replacement products?
  • What makes me unique…what’s my defensible competitive advantage?
  • What’s my profit model…how will I make money?

Those are the questions an entrepreneur asks.

They have a vision for what the business can become in the future, and they work to draw a line between the present and that future vision.

Every action they take, every decision they make, is in the context of moving toward that vision. As a result, entrepreneurs work ON their business rather than being trapped IN their business.

They are 100% aware that they OWN A BUSINESS.

That means they understand things like,

  • you’re not keeping cows…you’re running a profitable livestock business
  • you’re not gardening…you’re running a profitable market garden business
  • you’re not raising chickens…you’re running a profitable pastured poultry business
  • you’re not making cheese…you’re running a profitable artisan cheese business
  • you’re not giving a farm tour…you’re running a profitable agritourism business

The bottom line is, you’re running a profitable farming business.

One that just happens to afford you the natural lifestyle you desire.

You left or sacrificed another career choice for this one, but just as that other career paid you money, your job is to make sure your farm or small business MAKES YOU MONEY.

Otherwise, it’s not remotely sustainable.

This is how entrepreneurs think. And, as the owner of a farming business, you’re an entrepreneur, so this is how you must think.

This is really a critical issue, and it’s one of the first course lessons I teach in the Small Farm Nation Academy.

That course is called the Farm Business Mindset, and goes much deeper into this topic.

I recognize that not everyone…not most people, really, feel that they are entrepreneurial.

So I created lessons to show you how to become entrepreneurial and included downloads to help members focus on the critical priorities to build their farm business.

The Farm Business Mindset course includes a lesson on creating a one-page farm business plan, with it’s own downloadable template.

All the other marketing courses in the Small Farm Nation Academy are important too.

The courses on developing your farm brand, WordPress 101, website design, email list building, copywriting, blogging and so on, they’re all important.

And, sometimes members want to jump the gun and dive into those later courses. But the most important lesson is to make sure you have the right foundation in place.

And that means recognizing that you’re not just farming…you’re running a farm business!

Listen in as I help you get on track with your farming BUSINESS!

Thanks for Listening!

To help the show:

Thanks for listening. Until next time!

 

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The phrase hobby farm is cute and all, but what’s the difference between a hobby farm and a farming business? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you might have a farm hobby that costs you money rather than a thriving farm business that earns yo... Free marketing course at smallfarmnation.com<br /> The phrase hobby farm is cute and all, but what’s the difference between a hobby farm and a farming business? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you might have a farm hobby that costs you money rather than a thriving farm business that earns you money.<br /> <br /> So, this topic of understanding the difference between farm hobbies and farm businesses is very important. It’s an issue I’ve see often with small farmers, as they seem to operate partly as a farm business and partly…or mainly, I should say,…as a hobby farm.<br /> <br /> And I understand why this happens when people opt out of other careers for farm life. <br /> <br /> What draws them is the idea of working on the land.<br /> <br /> Of having animals…livestock. Of tending sheep or chickens, collecting eggs, planting seeds, harvesting crops.<br /> <br /> Of growing food under blue skies to the soothing sounds of birds and bees rather than grating sounds of traffic and ambulances.<br /> <br /> And those are all great reasons to embrace farm life.<br /> <br /> But, notice I didn’t mention anything about finances?<br /> <br /> About customers?<br /> <br /> Because folks are rarely lured into this lifestyle by thoughts of, “I’ve got an idea of how to make a boatload of money farming.”<br /> <br /> So, it’s generally not the business plans or finances that lures them to these businesses.<br /> <br /> And that’s a shame, because, as you yourself may already know, these ARE businesses.<br /> <br /> And they’re not immune to the laws of business.<br /> <br /> Namely, they need customers and a sales price that far exceeds the production cost.<br /> <br /> And, that’s how they would approach any other business, right?<br /> <br /> I mean, if someone was stuck in a soul-sucking cubicle job and wanted out, and if they stumbled across an opportunity to start a dry-cleaning operation, wouldn’t they assess it as a business?<br /> <br /> They wouldn’t daydream about folding clothes and cleaning suits.<br /> <br /> No, they’d assess the business model, get confident with their profit projections and marketing strategy before pulling the trigger on the business.<br /> <br /> But this is where farming is different than most businesses.<br /> <br /> Not all, because, I know just as many people who have started restaurants, because the love to cook, as those who started farming, because they love to garden.<br /> <br /> But just because you can cook doesn’t remotely mean you can run a profitable restaurant.<br /> <br /> And ditto for farming.<br /> <br /> Listen in as I help you get on track with your farming BUSINESS! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 14:28
How to Start a Farm Business: Farming Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-start-a-farm-business/ Sun, 02 Jun 2019 02:00:33 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14362 Want to know How to Start a Farm Business? Here are 11 rules that will guide you so that your farm business is profitable, sustainable and enjoyable! Want to know How to Start a Farm Business? Here are 11 rules that will guide you so that your farm business is profitable, sustainable and enjoyable! Free video ecourse at smallfarmnation.com<br /> Many people dream of starting a sustainable family farm, but what are the keys to having a successful farm business?<br /> <br /> In this episode, I share my 11 business rules for starting and running a successful farm business. 11 may seem like an arbitrary number, but I think you'll find these to be compelling rules for starting and running a family farm business.<br /> <br /> I dive into all aspects of the business side of starting and running a farm business, covering:<br /> <br /> competitive differentiation and farm business strategy<br /> farm go-to-market approaches<br /> debt and farming<br /> bridging the gap between what the land needs and what the market needs<br /> understanding the impact a farm business has on family relationships<br /> balancing profit with passion<br /> understanding the critical difference between profit margins and cash flow<br /> when to start marketing your farm business<br /> Plus, in rule #10, which I'm sure will be the most controversial of the 11 rules, I give a piece of advice you rarely hear elsewhere. But I think it's critical to your success, if you truly want to have a profitable farm business. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 35:15 Critical Questions to Answer Before Buying Your Farm or Homestead: Farming Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/critical-questions-to-answer-before-buying-your-farm-or-homestead/ Sun, 26 May 2019 02:00:36 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14352 When you search for rural land you’ll find all sorts of places that look promising. But how do you know if you’ve found your dream property? Today, I’ll share what we’ve learned and cover the 23 questions you should answer before buying that rural property. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Small Farm Nation on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or TuneIn So, Liz and I have bought rural property twice now. It’s both an exciting and exhausting time, Before you plunk down that deposit on the first rural property that screams your name, consider this: you are planning to make a move there for life. A new life, a better life and, perhaps, not only the rest of your life but a homestead that future generations will cherish.  So, yeah, it’s appropriate to take time and weigh the decision against criteria that are important to you and your family. With that in mind, I’ve come up with a list of 23 important questions you should ask and answer when looking for rural property. But, really, these 23 questions are more like 23 categories. As you’ll hear, each question…or category…has many sub-questions, so it’s way more than 23 questions. So, having said that, let’s get going on our list of 23 questions to ask when looking for rural property. 1. How much land do you really need? This gets to the issue of land lust, as we all seem to want more land and more privacy. But the question you’ll need to answer is how much land do you actually need to achieve your goals or dream? I mean, if you simply want to have a garden and some chickens you can certainly homestead on less than an acre.  Many people do. But what if you want livestock, such as cows and horses?  How about orchards? Do you want to be able to hunt on your own land…do you want a lake or pond for recreation and fishing? The risk here is that you, like us, will say…yeah, I want all that, and more. But of course, all that comes at a cost, both financially and in terms of upkeep. So you have to be clear on your goals because keeping chickens and rabbits require very little land, sheep and goats require a little more and cows require, at a minimum, one or two acres of dedicated pasture each… and that is IF you are in good pasture/rainfall areas typical of the eastern United States. In much of the western parts of the U.S. more land is usually required, often much more. And if you are thinking about having horses, get far more rural property—10 acres per horse (in the east) in addition to your house, driveway, garden, etc. Okay, moving on. Question # 2. Can you COMFORTABLY afford the land? Only you know how much you can afford for the home and land. Can you purchase your rural property and be debt-free?  You’ve heard me talk about this before so you know I think this is a really important milestone to achieve. But, if you’re not there yet, can you comfortably afford the down payment with plenty of financial reserves left over to deal with the unexpected? And I mean plenty because there’s always a need for money out here. For instance, how much will any improvements to the land or buildings cost? Then there’s the cost for livestock, trees and garden beds and so on. So make sure your purchase leaves you with financial reserves. # 3. How is the water? Does the land have excellent water? (I encourage you to make this a very high priority.) Does the water come from a natural spring or has a well been drilled? If it is a spring, is it located above the elevation of the house and garden so you can use gravity for water distribution? If the water is from a well, how many gallons per minute does it produce AND what is the static water depth? For example, on our last farm, we had two wells, each 300 feet deep that produced over 45 gallons per minute, but the static water depth is less than 40 feet. On my current homestead, we only have one well that produces about 5 gallons per minute, but that’s plenty. Besides, When you search for rural land you’ll find all sorts of places that look promising. But how do you know if you’ve found your dream property? Today, I’ll share what we’ve learned and cover the 23 questions you should answer before buying that rural property.

Listen to the Podcast

Subscribe to Small Farm Nation on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or TuneIn

So, Liz and I have bought rural property twice now. It’s both an exciting and exhausting time,

Before you plunk down that deposit on the first rural property that screams your name, consider this: you are planning to make a move there for lifeA new life, a better life and, perhaps, not only the rest of your life but a homestead that future generations will cherish.  So, yeah, it’s appropriate to take time and weigh the decision against criteria that are important to you and your family.

With that in mind, I’ve come up with a list of 23 important questions you should ask and answer when looking for rural property. But, really, these 23 questions are more like 23 categories. As you’ll hear, each question…or category…has many sub-questions, so it’s way more than 23 questions.

So, having said that, let’s get going on our list of 23 questions to ask when looking for rural property.

1. How much land do you really need?

This gets to the issue of land lust, as we all seem to want more land and more privacy. But the question you’ll need to answer is how much land do you actually need to achieve your goals or dream?

I mean, if you simply want to have a garden and some chickens you can certainly homestead on less than an acre.  Many people do.

But what if you want livestock, such as cows and horses?  How about orchards? Do you want to be able to hunt on your own land…do you want a lake or pond for recreation and fishing?

The risk here is that you, like us, will say…yeah, I want all that, and more.

But of course, all that comes at a cost, both financially and in terms of upkeep.

So you have to be clear on your goals because keeping chickens and rabbits require very little land, sheep and goats require a little more and cows require, at a minimum, one or two acres of dedicated pasture each… and that is IF you are in good pasture/rainfall areas typical of the eastern United States.

In much of the western parts of the U.S. more land is usually required, often much more.

And if you are thinking about having horses, get far more rural property—10 acres per horse (in the east) in addition to your house, driveway, garden, etc.

Okay, moving on.

Question # 2. Can you COMFORTABLY afford the land?

Only you know how much you can afford for the home and land. Can you purchase your rural property and be debt-free?  You’ve heard me talk about this before so you know I think this is a really important milestone to achieve.

But, if you’re not there yet, can you comfortably afford the down payment with plenty of financial reserves left over to deal with the unexpected?

And I mean plenty because there’s always a need for money out here.

For instance, how much will any improvements to the land or buildings cost?

Then there’s the cost for livestock, trees and garden beds and so on.

So make sure your purchase leaves you with financial reserves.

# 3. How is the water?

Does the land have excellent water? (I encourage you to make this a very high priority.) Does the water come from a natural spring or has a well been drilled?

If it is a spring, is it located above the elevation of the house and garden so you can use gravity for water distribution? If the water is from a well, how many gallons per minute does it produce AND what is the static water depth?

For example, on our last farm, we had two wells, each 300 feet deep that produced over 45 gallons per minute, but the static water depth is less than 40 feet.

On my current homestead, we only have one well that produces about 5 gallons per minute, but that’s plenty. Besides, we have lots of springs and small streams on this property, and we just put in a one-acre pond.

Also, have you tested the water quality? Most likely it will be hard water. I’m sure your test results will show it’s fine to drink, but you’ll be wondering why your dishes come out foggy and dusty looking.

So here’s a hint…add a small amount of citric acid along with the detergent when you run your dishwater, and your dishes will look fine.

But back to water.

If it is raw land have you received an estimate for the cost of drilling a well?

If you’re going to farm you can offset the cost of the well with an EQIP grant…I covered those in episode 22 of SSL.  Otherwise it will set you back at least $5-$10K.

And if you don’t have a well but need one, check the well depths and flow rates for your closest neighbors first so you can have confidence that your well will perform as needed.

Finally, as it relates to water, if you plan on raising livestock, how will you get water to them?

#4 Is there good potential for alternative energy?

Many homesteaders share the dream of completely off-grid, but that is not possible if the land is not conducive to energy production.

If you are considering solar energy, does the land have excellent sun exposure or is it surrounded by dense woods?

If you are considering wind or hydro-power, is the land suitable for that?

Is there a woodlot so you can cut your own firewood if you plan to heat with wood? And is it the right kind of wood?

Elm and Ash burn fine but they burn fast and doesn’t put out nearly the BTU’s as oak or hickory. All wood species aren’t the same, so find out what you have.

If you don’t know, you can get the forestry department to come out and walk the land for you, for free. That’s what we did.

Moving on.

#5 Do you have a good understanding of the local weather?

How much rain per year does the area receive?  More importantly, how frequently does the rain come?

Now, this issue of frequency is a big deal. Here’s why…on our previous property in Georgia, we averaged over 50 inches of rain per year.

Sounds nice, right? Yet we often went through the hottest parts of summer and received only one to two inches during a three-month period.

That created a lot of stress on our livestock and gardens, and our large pond would go down 2-4 feet. That made it hard to keep oxygen in the pond for fish.

So it’s not enough to know how much rain you get per year. You need to know how much you can depend on frequent rain. And it’s this reason that I prefer land in or near the mountains.

Also, what are the winters like where you are looking? And the summers?  How frequently is there a drought?  Of flooding?

What about the risk of tornadoes and hurricanes? Wildfires?

Just something else for you to factor into this big decision.

#6 What is the growing season and how long is it?

This is one of the reasons we moved from our prior farm because we wanted to live in a different gardening zone.

For your desired location, have you spoken with other local gardeners and/or agriculture extension offices? Do you know what crops can be grown, when they must be planted and harvested?

What kind of fruits can you grow? You might fantasize about an apple orchard but good luck if you’re looking in central Florida.

Also, what kind of pests are you likely to encounter? Do you have skills in all these areas or are you starting from scratch?

Either way, see if there’s a master gardener’s group in your new area. Or at least talk to the county extension agent first to see if they’re knowledgeable about small-scale organic food production.

#7 What is the community like where you’re moving?

Are there like-minded people in the area, whether it be for homesteading, homeschooling or what not?

Are there groups or organizations you would like to join? Can you join them BEFORE you move to see first-hand what the people are like? Nowadays, some of these groups are online, notably in Facebook groups. So you can join well before you move.

Are there gardening clubs, homeschooling support groups and so on? Because just as there are micro-climates in the weather, there are also micro-cultures.

So, did you subscribe to the local newspaper BEFORE making an offer and relocating? If so, how is the help wanted section? Skimpy or full?  What does that tell you about the local economy?

What about police reports? What crime is in the community and how close is it to the property you are considering?

Are there many foreclosure listings or only a few?

# 8 How likely is it the community will drastically change?

Is the town you are considering located between major points of interest that may cause it to grow over time?

For example, I grew up in a beautiful mountain town in northern Georgia that was quaint and sparsely populated, with families who had lived in the county for generations.  It’s the town where the movie Deliverance was filmed.

Lots of other movies were filmed there too, and my mom actually waited on Walt Disney and Fess Parker back in the 50s when they were filming The Great Locomotive Chase.

But that was then, when the town was remote and…well…a little backwards, I guess. Or quaint, if you prefer that word.

Today, the town is still there but “prosperity” has arrived in the form of fast-food restaurants, souvenir shops, chain coffee shops, and LOTS of traffic.

Why?

Because a major road that connects Georgia to the Smoky Mountains goes right through the valley where the town is located.

So while it was once the town I’d like to live near, today I wouldn’t want to live anywhere near it.

Moving right along.

#9 What are the immediate neighbors like?

If you are seriously considering a specific property, have you introduced yourselves to the neighbors before making an offer?

Do you share anything in common with them? Children, hobbies, political beliefs, religious views, societal views, etc?

Would you invite them over for dinner? Would you want to go to dinner at their house?

One of my neighbors about a half mile down the road has a large apple orchard, so we’re able to discuss pruning trees and growing apples.

Plus we share similar views on preparedness, which is an important consideration if you think of yourself as a prepper.

Now, there aren’t many people around with young kids, like we have.

But we’ve found that to be pretty normal when looking at rural property.

More often than not the population is gray…or bald.

Still, make an effort to talk to at least one of your neighbors. Or stop by the local store…every small town has a gas station slash candy bar store, and ask them about the area.

#10 How remote is it/how close to town?

One of the best things about homesteading can be seclusion, but, for some, it can also be the worst. This is particularly true if you’re a “people person” or love to shop at Target. You’ll find all that stuff to be far away.

So, how close do you want to be to a town? And what do you want out of the town? Simply a store or two?

Or are you interested in being close to decent restaurants, yoga studios, pubs, golf courses and the like?

There are no right answers, but be honest about what you want and find that community.

#11 What are the physical characteristics of the specific land you are considering?

Is it flat, gently sloping, or steep mountainside?

Ours is a mix of gently sloping to steep, and that’s important to us.

Why?

  1. the ridges give us a lot of privacy between us and neighbors, none of which can be seen from our house.
  2. And because an area with two small streams between two sloping hillsides created the perfect spot for a large pond, which we very much wanted.

What about your new land? Is it wide open with no trees or are there wind breaks?  If you plan on raising livestock, they’ll want some shade and protection. Plus the windbreaks increase your privacy.

But what about the soil drainage? That’ super important if you plan on putting in a septic system. You’ll need to know that the land can perk.

Even if you don’t, you don’t want flat land that doesn’t drain. It’ll be hard to grow things if the ground is always flooded.

Also, if your land has pasture, what perennial forages are growing there now? Is the pasture suitable for your intended use? Are there also legumes such as clovers, vetch and so on that can help fix nitrogen to the soil?

Is it only one species of grass, such as Bermuda, or is the pasture a mix of forages? Does the forage match the animals you hope to put on it?

For example, if the pasture consists of “old” fescue that is prone to endophytes, it may not be wise to plan on raising horses.

How is the earthworm activity? Did you bring a shovel to dig a quick scoop? You should get at least one earthworm in each scoop.

Is the garden area positioned for maximum sun exposure?

Is the land fenced?  Is there a perimeter fence around the entire property? Are the pastures cross-fenced for rotational grazing? If so, are the fences high-tensile, woven-wire field fence, wooden fence or what? What is their condition?  How much time will it take you to maintain and mow them?

These are just a few of the questions you’ll want to ask about the physical aspects of your new property.

#12 How was the land previously used?

Regardless of whether the land is beautiful or unkempt, do you know how it was previously used?

Were chemicals used and, if so, when were they last applied? What types of fertilizers, if any, were applied? Was the land frequently disked or tilled?

Have you confirmed that you will own ALL water and mineral rights?

Most states in the eastern US follow the riparian rights concept. That means the landowner has the rights to water on, or underneath, their land. And if they own land adjacent to a river or lake they’re entitled to withdraw water from those water bodies, as long as they use the water on their property.

It’s very different in the western states that tend to receive far less rainfall.  With water being more scarce each year, they follow prior appropriation water rights.

That means local irrigation districts define water rights and assign the highest priority for water during droughts to the first people to apply for a beneficial use.

Bottom line…check out your area to see if the water on your dream land actually is yours or not.

The same thing applies to surface and subsurface mineral rights, but you get the point by now.

Talk to someone knowledgeable in your area and know what is yours and what isn’t.

#13 Have you tested the soil?

You are what you eat, so you will want to know what is in the soil.

Have you had it tested or asked the current owner if they’ve had it tested?  When you tested the soil, did you sample several areas of the land and pasture, or only one? What were the recommendations for soil improvement for each area? How long will it take to get the soil where it needs to be based on your planned use for it?

Granted, this is probably more important if you plan on farming the land versus homesteading, but you still may want to know.

I mean, you may dream of having a personal vineyard or planting a large orchard, but is the land suitable for that?

For example, if it’s acidic, that’s great for growing blueberries and pine trees, but not a lot else. So how much lime is required to decrease the acidity and what is the cost for purchasing and spreading the lime?

And if you’re gonna raise livestock, you’ll want to know if the soil sorely lacks nutrients that your animals need, such as selenium or manganese.

Even if you’re not gonna keep livestock, we both know the you’re gonna have a garden. I mean, what homesteader doesn’t. So what are the specific recommendations for the garden area?

Again, have you sought the free advice of the local county extension agent?

To some extent you can mitigate this with raised beds and bringing in soil or compost, but it’s better, and cheaper, if you don’t have to.

#14 Who maintains the roads?

If you’re moving from suburbia, this will be a new concept for you.

Is your new property accessible by nice, maintained roads, or is it accessible only via Class IV (unimproved) roads that you may need to maintain? Is there a driveway to your house or must you install one? Have you considered the costs for gravel, grading, plowing, etc?

Your long gravel drive may be dreamy, but guess who’ll maintain it. You will, Bucko.

That means clearing snow and grading it, which I can promise you it will need from time to time.

So check this issue out before moving and make sure you’re up for it.

#15 Does the land have potential for your plans?

Sure, you may want to start simply with a garden and a dozen chickens, but is it possible you may want to grow your farmstead into something more?

If so, will the land accommodate your dreams?

Is there room for the cows, sheep, horses, buildings, ponds or whatever visions tease you while sleeping?

This is something I look at closely when evaluating property. I visualize what I want the land to look like as much as what it does look like.

I gave you the example of the pond we put in earlier, and I talked a lot about how to improve pastures and land in my first book, The Accidental Farmers.

Again, is there a sunny spot for the garden on your new property, or is the land on a mountainside where direct sunlight is measured in minutes rather than hours?

#16 Does the land have usable outbuildings?

That’s great if it does, but what is their condition?

Can you afford any repair costs or can you do it yourself?

Can the buildings be used for future income-generating ideas that are discussed in this book, such as for classes or events?

You know I talk a fair amount about self-sufficient entrepreneurship, and if you’re interested in earning money from your farmstead, you can use these buildings to get started.

They’ll be of great value to you but little value to the current owner.

#17 Are there local hospitals and high-quality health care?

If you frequently need medical attention, are there hospitals and good doctors within a reasonable driving distance?  Is there good emergency care should someone in your family suffer an injury on the farm?

Is there adequate dental care?

I don’t have much else to say on this issue, but you’ll know whether this should rank as an important consideration for you or not.

#18 Is the house (or homesite) properly placed in its environment?

A house snuggled up against the woods sounds great, right? That’s until you find the woods are loaded with copperheads or timber rattlers who take a liking to your back porch.

If the land has a house on it, is it where you want it?  After all, it’ pretty hard to move it later.

Have you really visualized yourself in the home?

Is the garden area placed downslope from the house so you can use the house roof to capture rainwater for the garden? That would be nice if you could.

But if it is, where is the septic system relative to the garden area, since it too will be downslope from the house?

You don’t want to build your raised beds or plant your garden right on top of it.

#19 Does the land afford the ability to hunt and/or fish?

You may grow much of your own food, but if you enjoy meat, you can also hunt or fish it for free.

Does your land allow that?

Is there an abundance of deer, turkey, wild pigs, freshwater fish or whatever you are interested in?

Access to this can dramatically reduce the cost of food for you and your animals.

I’d hate to not have access to this. We’ll probably raise some turkeys this year since we always do, but I can’t imagine why. There are so many wild turkeys walking around, pretty much right up to our porch, that it seems crazy to raise some.

Of course there’s tons of deer and big lakes nearby, but we just put in a one acre pond so we can have a lifetime of fishing.

If these things are important to you too, make sure your property has them, or can have them.

#20 Are there neighborhood dogs?

If your new land is not securely fenced, are there neighborhood dogs that may enjoy your new chickens or rabbits? Do you know for sure?

Does anyone else in the area seem to raise goats/chickens or the like? If so, can you stop and talk to them.

Just another thing for you to ponder.

#21 Are there other potential hazards of the location you are considering?

I’ve mentioned snakes, but what about other wildlife such as bears, mountain lions and wolves?

Even wild hogs are a hazard in terms of wrecking your gardens and food plots.

Are you in a frequent tornado or hurricane risk area?

Is there poisonous vegetation that could harm you (or your animals), such as poison sumac, poison ivy, poison oak, wild cherry trees?

Those can be poisonous to livestock.

Are there pasture grasses high in prussic acid, such as sudangrass and sorghum-sudan? Grazed improperly, these can be deadly to cattle.

Even if your pastures don’t have them, if local pastures do and that’s where you’re getting your hay, you can still have problems.

And, while not necessarily a “hazard,” are there nuisances such as fire ants or seasonal gnats and/or mosquitos that could spread disease?

Man, are we glad to be away from fire ants!

Don’t forget about disease-spreading ticks. Is Lyme Disease a risk in your new area? I don’t mean to scare you, but: embracing the simplicity of self-sufficient living means embracing ALL of nature.

#22 Are there zoning restrictions?

Covenants? HOAs?  Hopefully you’re moving away from that and not to it, and my recommendation is to not move anywhere that has a HOA or any covenants.

Regardless, are there local zoning restrictions?

Can you later open a bed and breakfast or offer farm dinners/classes if you want?  Can you erect barns and simple farm structures without a permit (and fees), or is that required for even the most simple structure?

Believe me, you may not begin planning on any of these things, but growing the farmstead becomes addictive for many, and may for you as well.

Now, let’s jump to the final question. It’s short and sweet.

#23 Did you rent or camp in the area prior to making an offer?

If you are unfamiliar with the area, did you rent or camp in the area for an extended time first?

Are you certain this is the community for you?  After all, you do not want to hate your new home!

Clearly, purchasing a rural property and leaving “normal” life behind to become more self-sufficient represents a major life decision.

It may be one of the most important decisions you ever make and, therefore, deserves careful consideration.

Still, having made that move myself over a decade ago, I highly recommend the lifestyle and would never “go back.” I don’t know anyone who would!

Now, think about these questions and feel free to add your own.

That way you’ll be fully armed with the knowledge you need to leave the rat race behind for your piece of rural paradise.

Listen into this episode as I walk you through the 23 Questions to Ask Before Buying Rural Land. So, if you’re looking for ways to tips and inspiration to become more self-sufficient, you won’t want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair!


 

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When you search for rural land you’ll find all sorts of places that look promising. But how do you know if you’ve found your dream property? Today, I’ll share what we’ve learned and cover the 23 questions you should answer before buying that rural prop... Free training at smallfarmnation.com<br /> When you search for rural land you’ll find all sorts of places that look promising. But how do you know if you’ve found your dream property? Today, I’ll share what we’ve learned and cover the 23 questions you should answer before buying that rural property.<br /> <br /> Welcome to Episode 27! So, Liz and I have bought rural property twice now.<br /> <br /> It’s both an exciting and exhausting time, but before you plunk down that deposit on the first rural property that screams your name, consider this: you are planning to make a move there for life.<br /> <br /> A new life, a better life and, perhaps, not only the rest of your life but a homestead that future generations will cherish.<br /> <br /> So, yeah, it’s appropriate to take time and weigh the decision against criteria that are important to you and your family.<br /> <br /> With that in mind, I’ve come up with a list of 23 important questions you should ask and answer when looking for rural property.<br /> <br /> But, really, these 23 questions are more like 23 categories.<br /> <br /> As you’ll hear in this episode, each question…or category…has many sub-questions, so it’s way more than 23 questions.<br /> <br /> Listen into this episode as I walk you through the 23 Questions to Ask Before Buying Rural Land. So, if you're looking for ways to tips and inspiration to become more self-sufficient, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 39:01
How Farmers Use Coolbots to Keep Products Cool: Farm Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-farmers-use-coolbots-to-keep-products-cool/ Sun, 19 May 2019 02:00:32 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14315 Whether you're selling market vegetables, pastured meats or raw milk and farmstead cheese, one thing's for certain. You gotta keep your products cool to preserve shelf life. In this episode, we learn how farmers use Coolbots to do just that. Whether you're selling market vegetables, pastured meats or raw milk and farmstead cheese, one thing's for certain. You gotta keep your products cool to preserve shelf life. In this episode, we learn how farmers use Coolbots to do just that. smallfarmnation.com <br /> Whether you're selling market vegetables, pastured meats or raw milk and farmstead cheese, one thing's for certain. You gotta keep your products cool to preserve shelf life. In this episode, we learn how farmers use Coolbots to do just that. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 52:44 Why your farm’s ideal customer doesn’t matter: Farming Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/why-your-farms-ideal-customer-doesnt-matter/ Sun, 12 May 2019 02:00:50 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14302 You’ve probably heard how important it is to define and communicate with your ideal customer. So is it? In this episode, I’ll tell you why it’s a waste of time focusing on mythical ideal customers and walk you through what you should be doing, instead! You’ve probably heard how important it is to define and communicate with your ideal customer. So is it? In this episode, I’ll tell you why it’s a waste of time focusing on mythical ideal customers and walk you through what you should be doing, instead! smallfarmnation.com <br /> You’ve probably heard how important it is to define and communicate with your ideal customer. So is it? In this episode, I’ll tell you why it’s a waste of time focusing on mythical ideal customers and walk you through what you should be doing, instead! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 14:17 Should you start a Facebook page or a Facebook group?https://smallfarmnation.com/should-you-start-a-facebook-page-or-a-facebook-group/ Sun, 05 May 2019 02:00:56 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14288 This week I’ll answer a listener’s question on whether it’s best to start a Facebook page or a Facebook group for her farm. I cover the pros and cons of each and describe what you can do with a Facebook page that you can't do in a group, and vice versa. This week I’ll answer a listener’s question on whether it’s best to start a Facebook page or a Facebook group for her farm. I cover the pros and cons of each and describe what you can do with a Facebook page that you can't do in a group, and vice versa. smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week I’ll answer a listener’s question on whether it’s best to start a Facebook page or a Facebook group for her farm. I cover the pros and cons of each and describe what you can do with a Facebook page that you can't do in a group, and vice versa. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 18:23 Random Acts of Farm Marketinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/random-acts-of-farm-marketing/ Sun, 28 Apr 2019 02:00:56 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14281 Let's discuss a crisis in small business. A crisis in most businesses, actually, but particularly in farm businesses. It’s a problem that creates undue stress, panic and results in farmers not building their brands, getting enough customers and growing their farm business. I’m talking about Random Acts of Farm Marketing. Let's discuss a crisis in small business. A crisis in most businesses, actually, but particularly in farm businesses. It’s a problem that creates undue stress, panic and results in farmers not building their brands, smallfarmnation.com Today I want to discuss a crisis in small business. A crisis in most businesses, actually, but particularly in farm businesses. It’s a problem that creates undue stress, panic and results in farmers not building their brands, getting enough customers and growing their farm business.<br /> <br /> I’m talking about Random Acts of Farm Marketing. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 25:04 Why You Must Start Marketing Before You Start Farminghttps://smallfarmnation.com/start-marketing-your-farm-before-you-open-for-business/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 02:00:57 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14209 If you’re planning to start a farm—or any small business—when should you start marketing it? In this episode I explain why you should start marketing your farm BEFORE you even open for business. If you’re planning to start a farm—or any small business—when should you start marketing it? In this episode I explain why you should start marketing your farm BEFORE you even open for business. smallfarmnation.com <br /> If you’re planning to start a farm—or any small business—when should you start marketing it? In this episode I explain why you should start marketing your farm BEFORE you even open for business. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 30:13 How to Create a Great Farm Brand: Farm Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-build-a-great-farm-brand/ Sun, 14 Apr 2019 02:00:13 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14195 Building a recognized brand for your farm business is one of your most important priorities. This episode discusses why and how to do it. Building a recognized brand for your farm business is one of your most important priorities. This episode discusses why and how to do it. smallfarmnation.com <br /> Big businesses spend a fortune building their brands. But is branding important for your farm business? Today, I’m here to tell you that it absolutely is critical to build your farm brand, and I’ll explain why. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 16:59 Selling meat by weight online & taking payments for farm tourshttps://smallfarmnation.com/selling-meat-by-weight-online-taking-payments-for-farm-tours/ Sun, 07 Apr 2019 02:00:26 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14156 This week I tackle three questions. One is about the tricky issue of selling meat by product weight online. A related question is about managing inventory of meat when selling both online and at a farm store. And the third question is about managing the reservation and payment process for farm tours. This week I tackle three questions. One is about the tricky issue of selling meat by product weight online. A related question is about managing inventory of meat when selling both online and at a farm store. smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week I’ve got three questions to tackle. One is about the tricky issue of selling meat by product weight online. A related question is about managing inventory of meat when selling both online and at a farm store. And the third question is about managing the reservation and payment process for farm tours.<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 17:23 Robert Brady on Marketing Your Farm with Google Adshttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-market-your-farm-business-with-google-ads/ Sun, 31 Mar 2019 02:00:25 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14169 This week I’m speaking with a farmer turned online marketing expert about how to use Google Ads to attract customers to your farm business. If you're interested in farm marketing, you'll get a lot out of Robert's expertise, as I did.  Enjoy the episode! This week I’m speaking with a farmer turned online marketing expert about how to use Google Ads to attract customers to your farm business. If you're interested in farm marketing, you'll get a lot out of Robert's expertise, as I did.  Enjoy the episode! smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week I'm joined by Robert Brady of Righteous Marketing. Robert has a very unique background of great interest to Small Farm Nation. He grew up on a farm and his father still runs a successful pasture-based beef farm. Yet, Robert has become an online marketing expert and has a particular expertise in Google Ads, formerly Google Adwords. <br /> <br /> In this enlightening discussion, Robert gives concrete examples of how he markets his father's grassfed beef farm using Google Ads. He also explains clearly why Google Ads has a decided advantage over Faceebook ads when it comes to attracting people who actually become paying customers.<br /> <br /> If you're interested in farm marketing, you'll get a lot out of Robert's expertise, as I did.  Enjoy the episode! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:02:52 How to Set Wholesale Prices & When to Buy Farm Equipmenthttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-set-wholesale-prices-when-to-buy-farm-equipment/ Sun, 24 Mar 2019 02:00:56 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14139 This week I address listener questions on: When to buy farm equipment, whether to buy new or used equipment, and how to set wholesale prices for farm products. This week I address listener questions on: When to buy farm equipment, whether to buy new or used equipment, and how to set wholesale prices for farm products. smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week I address listener questions on: When to buy farm equipment, whether to buy new or used equipment, and how to set wholesale prices for farm products. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 26:44 How to Write a Great About Page for Your Farmhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-write-your-farms-about-page/ Sun, 17 Mar 2019 02:00:38 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=14053 Lots of farmers struggle with how to share their story. In this week's farm podcast, I share the advice I gave to a farmer about how to share her story and create a great about page for your website. Lots of farmers struggle with how to share their story. In this week's farm podcast, I share the advice I gave to a farmer about how to share her story and create a great about page for your website. smallfarmnation.com <br /> Lots of farmers struggle with how to share their story. In this week's farm podcast, I share the advice I gave to a farmer about how to share her story and create a great about page for your website. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 24:28 When to Avoid Sales Funnels and Marketing Gimmickshttps://smallfarmnation.com/why-your-farm-should-avoid-sales-funnels-and-marketing-gimmicks/ Sun, 10 Mar 2019 02:00:23 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13916 In this farm podcast, I discuss why you may not want to use automated sales funnels and marketing gimmicks in marketing your farm business. I describe the Jeff Walker Product Launch Formula, what it's designed to do and why I recommend that farmers exercise caution with this strategy. In this farm podcast, I discuss why you may not want to use automated sales funnels and marketing gimmicks in marketing your farm business. I describe the Jeff Walker Product Launch Formula, what it's designed to do and why I recommend that farmers ex... smallfarmnation.com <br /> In this farm podcast, I discuss why you may not want to use automated sales funnels and marketing gimmicks in marketing your farm business. I describe the Jeff Walker Product Launch Formula, what it's designed to do and why I recommend that farmers exercise caution with this strategy. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 39:56 Joel Salatin on How to Swap a Depressing Job for a Rewarding Farmhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-swap-a-depressing-job-for-a-rewarding-farm/ Sun, 03 Mar 2019 02:00:18 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13780 In this farm podcast, Joel Salatin and I have a provocative discussion about how to quit an unfulfilling job and start a farm business. Joel offers some real gems in this episode, as he outlines his seven rules for starting a profitable farm. We talk at length about his latest book, Your Successful Farm Business, which can be thought of as a graduate course to the book that got so many people started in farming, You Can Farm! In this farm podcast, Joel Salatin and I have a provocative discussion about how to quit an unfulfilling job and start a farm business. Joel offers some real gems in this episode, as he outlines his seven rules for starting a profitable farm. smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms and I have a provocative discussion about how to quit an unfulfilling job and start a farm business. Joel offers some real gems in this episode, as he outlines his seven rules for starting a profitable farm. We talk at length about his latest book, Your Successful Farm Business, which can be thought of as a graduate course to the book that got so many people started in farming, You Can Farm!<br /> <br /> You’ve heard Joel and you’ve seen him in movies discuss the importance of regenerative agriculture. Now listen as he outlines step-by-step how to quit your job and start your own profitable farm. We discuss grassfed beef, pastured poultry and:<br /> -Joel Salatin’s seven rules for starting a successful farm business.<br /> - What type of farm enterprise Joel would choose to start today if starting over, and why.<br /> - Why someone should want to trade jobs and start a farm.<br /> - Ways for new farmers to get experience and get up to speed.<br /> - The critical importance of building a team, and why most farmers don’t do it.<br /> - How Polyface uses standard operating procedures and sets performance expectations for apprentices.<br /> - The risk-free tactic Polyface used to grow their Metropolitan Buying Club from only 30 families to over 1,000! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:23:34 How to Start a Profitable Flower Farmhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-start-a-profitable-flower-farm/ Sun, 24 Feb 2019 02:00:33 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13617 People have been talking about the importance of local food for years but what about local flowers? In this farm podcast, I'm speaking with a "farmpreneur" who found the courage to quit her job and start a thriving flower farm. Even though she had never farmed before. People have been talking about the importance of local food for years but what about local flowers? In this farm podcast, I'm speaking with a "farmpreneur" who found the courage to quit her job and start a thriving flower farm. smallfarmnation.com <br /> Joining me today is Niki Irving the flower farmer and florist behind flourish flower farm in Asheville. Niki's farm grows specialty an heirloom cut flowers using sustainable and natural practices and Nikki also creates seasonally inspired floral designs for weddings and special events.<br /> In this episode, you'll learn...<br /> - How Niki started Flourish Flower Farm with no farming background. <br /> - The capital and equipment needed to start a flower farm. <br /> - "Surprise" expenses Niki encountered in running a flower farm.<br /> - Niki's tips for storytelling and marketing on Instagram and social media.<br /> - Selling and arranging flowers for the wedding market.<br /> - Why Niki doesn't like the CSA model and why she sells to retailers<br /> - The importance of soil testing in starting a farm.<br /> - When/how to harvest and and store fresh cut flowers.<br /> - How Niki used a CoolBot to set-up refrigeration for her flower farm.<br /> - The shelf-life of cut flowers and when to harvest.<br /> - Why Niki chose flower farming even though she apprenticed on a vegetable farm.<br /> - The research and business planning Niki did prior to starting her farm business.<br /> - Why Niki thinks you should quit your job if you want to farm, and how she found the courage to do so.<br /> - How and why Niki started with leased land instead of purchasing land.<br /> - Whether you should grow flowers on flat land or sloped land.<br /> - How Niki chooses which flowers to plant and what are her most profitable crops.<br /> - Dealing "organically" with Japanese Beetles, deer, turkey and other pests.<br /> - Niki's best flower arrangement tips.<br /> - Don't forget to check out the smallfarmnationacademy.com whenever you're ready to GET GROWING!<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:23:03 How to Start a Farm Tanning Sheepskinshttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-start-a-farm-tanning-sheepskins/ Sun, 17 Feb 2019 02:00:51 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13481 As sustainable livestock farmers, we want to honor the whole animal. But what about when it comes to using the animals hides? Joining me in this farm podcast, is Sarah Scully founder of Vermont Natural Sheepskins. Sarah and her husband, Rick, started the first commercial organic tannery in America. As sustainable livestock farmers, we want to honor the whole animal. But what about when it comes to using the animals hides? Joining me in this farm podcast, is Sarah Scully founder of Vermont Natural Sheepskins. Sarah and her husband, Rick, smallfarmnation.com <br /> As sustainable livestock farmers, we want to honor the whole animal. But what about when it comes to using the animals hides? Joining me today is Sarah Scully founder of Vermont Natural Sheepskins. Sarah and her husband, Rick, started the first commercial organic tannery in America. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 39:26 How to Scale Up Pastured Poultryhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-scale-up-pastured-poultry/ Sun, 10 Feb 2019 06:00:42 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13416 Guess what? You CAN start a pastured poultry business and scale it to a size that supports a family. Or multiple families. Tune in as Paul Grieve from Pasturebird and Primal Pastures shares the story of how his family has done just that. Guess what? You CAN start a pastured poultry business and scale it to a size that supports a family. Or multiple families. Tune in as Paul Grieve from Pasturebird and Primal Pastures shares the story of how his family has done just that. smallfarmnation.com <br /> Today I'm speaking with Paul Grieve of pasture Pasturebird, a pasture poultry operation whose meat chickens are enjoyed by the Los Angeles Lakers and Dodgers and numerous chefs and consumers in Southern California. Paul is also one of the founders of Primal Pastures a family owned pastured farm that offers grass fed beef lamb chicken pork and other products. But whereasPrimal Pastures sells directly to the public pasture Pasturebird was created to sell wholesale. So Paul and I discussed selling wholesale versus direct to consumers and we also discussed shipping meat since both pasture Pasturebird and perennial pastures do exactly that. Now Paul discusses how online marketing and public relations have been invaluable tools in building their business from startup to multi-million dollars per year and just a few years. Paul also discusses the importance of building a farm brand. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:14:58 Starting Up a New Farmhttps://smallfarmnation.com/starting-up-a-new-farm/ Sun, 03 Feb 2019 09:00:56 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13362 In this farm podcast, I talk about the sometimes long and steady process of setting up a new farm. My guest is Jenn Colby of Howling Wolf Farm in Vermont. We also tackle the touchy issue of why it's sometimes more challenging for women farmers than men. Listen in to see what you think. In this farm podcast, I talk about the sometimes long and steady process of setting up a new farm. My guest is Jenn Colby of Howling Wolf Farm in Vermont. We also tackle the touchy issue of why it's sometimes more challenging for women farmers than me... smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week I talk about the sometimes long and steady process of setting up a new farm. My guest is Jenn Colby of Howling Wolf Farm in Vermont. We also tackle the touchy issue of why it's sometimes more challenging for women farmers than men. Listen in to see what you think. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:08:32 Craft Meat With Crowd Cowhttps://smallfarmnation.com/crowdfunding-craft-meat-with-crowd-cow/ Sat, 26 Jan 2019 02:00:39 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13086 In this farm podcast, I examine one of the biggest problems consumers face when wanting to buy directly from farmers, the problem of convenience. I talk with Joe Heitzeberg, co-founder and CEO of Crowd Cow. It’s an interesting business model that is endeavoring to make it easier for farmers and consumers to come together and celebrate what Crowd Cow calls “craft meat.” Tune in for a great story. In this farm podcast, I examine one of the biggest problems consumers face when wanting to buy directly from farmers, the problem of convenience. I talk with Joe Heitzeberg, co-founder and CEO of Crowd Cow. smallfarmnation.com <br /> I’ve got a fascinating episode this week as we examine one of the biggest problems consumers face when wanting to buy directly from farmers. And that problem is, it’s inconvenient. <br /> Today I’m speaking with Joe Heitzeberg, co-founder and CEO of Crowd Cow. <br /> Joe’s not a farmer—far from it. He’s something of a serial entrepreneur having started a number of tech companies. But a few years ago he became enamored with the whole idea of buying meat directly from a farmer. You’ll hear him tell the story in a few minutes, but it’s a transformation that I, and many of you, have gone through as well.<br /> Joe was a typical consumer who bought meat at the grocery store, giving little thought to where it came from or how one cut of meat could possibly be different from another.<br /> That all changed when a co-worker bounced down the hallway of their Seattle offices exclaiming, "I'm so excited! I'm getting my cow this Friday.” Joe couldn’t imagine what it meant to “get a cow” especially in downtown Seattle.<br /> But when the co-worker described how much better the beef tasted and the relationship he had with the farmer, Joe was hooked and decided he, too, had to get a cow.<br /> Now, for a lot of people, the story would end there.<br /> But when you give an idea like that to an entrepreneurial minded person, it tends to become more than an idea. It becomes a business opportunity.<br /> Joe and his partner Ethan launched Crowd Cow in 2015. It’s an interesting business model that is endeavoring to make it easier for farmers and consumers to come together and celebrate what Crowd Cow calls “craft meat.”<br /> Let’s find out what Joe means by that and listen into the story of how an innovative business is born as Joe and I discuss the story of Crowd Cow. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:07:36 Meat Rabbitshttps://smallfarmnation.com/saving-rabbits-by-eating-them-with-rare-hare-barn/ Sun, 20 Jan 2019 02:00:11 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13037 Today I’m speaking with Callene and Eric Rapp of Rare Hare Barn in Kansas. I love this topic of raising rabbits for meat because, in general, our society has become very disconnected from our food—and what food is, right? Nowhere in the meat world is that more evidenced than with rabbits. We discuss many fascinating aspects of running a rabbit enterprise on a small farm. Whether you’re a consumer, chef, homesteader or farmer, this is a thoroughly interesting discussion about the life (and death) of rabbits. Today I’m speaking with Callene and Eric Rapp of Rare Hare Barn in Kansas. I love this topic of raising rabbits for meat because, in general, our society has become very disconnected from our food—and what food is, right? smallfarmnation.com <br /> Today I’m speaking with Callene and Eric Rapp of Rare Hare Barn in Kansas. They raise a few types of heritage breed rabbits, including the American Chinchialla, which I’ve also raised quite a bit of.<br /> Now, I love this topic of raising rabbits for meat because our society has become very disconnected from our food—and what food is, right? <br /> Nowhere in the meat world is that more evidenced than with rabbits. Because, when I raised and sold them, we’d often get skittish consumers who claimed they had no idea what to do with a rabbit.<br /> So is cooking rabbit any different from cooking with chicken or other meats? You bet, and I discuss that and many other fascinating aspects of running a rabbit enterprise on a small farm.<br /> For those of you interested in raising rabbits either as a commercial enterprise or for your homestead, we discuss differences in breeds, growth rates and mistakes many people make with feeding and breeding.<br /> We also deep dive into the issue of production models. That is, we explore using cages versus pasture tractors versus colony raising rabbits.<br /> Doesn't matter if you’re a consumer, chef, homesteader or farmer, this is a thoroughly interesting discussion about the life (and death) of rabbits and of how one family is making a living in our small farm nation.<br /> Let’s get right to it with Callene and Eric Rapp of Rare Hare Barn. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:14:58 Sheep & Artisan Cheesehttps://smallfarmnation.com/sheep-cheese-agritourism-on-green-dirt-farm/ Sun, 13 Jan 2019 05:00:45 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=13012 In this episode I’m joined by Sarah Hoffman of Green Dirt Farm in Missouri, where she raises sheep on pasture, milks them and turns their milk into award-winning cheese. We discuss Sarah’s journey to farm life and how her desire to raise children in that setting led her and her husband to make some courageous career choices. In this episode I’m joined by Sarah Hoffman of Green Dirt Farm in Missouri, where she raises sheep on pasture, milks them and turns their milk into award-winning cheese. We discuss Sarah’s journey to farm life and how her desire to raise children in th... smallfarmnation.com <br /> In this episode I’m joined by Sarah Hoffman of Green Dirt Farm in Missouri, where she raises sheep on pasture, milks them and turns their milk into award-winning cheese.<br /> <br /> We discuss Sarah’s journey to farm life and how her desire to raise children in that setting led her and her husband to make some courageous career choices.<br /> <br /> Sarah ditched a medical career to become a first-time farmer. She’s learned a lot about selecting farmland and maximizing its potential, learning to safely make excellent cheese, marketing and cultivating customer relationships, animal husbandry and forage management.<br /> <br /> A big part of Green Dirt Farm’s success today is agritourism. Sarah shares her approach to farm dinners, cheese appreciation events and other tactics that deepen the relationship between her farm and her community.<br /> <br /> Whether you’re interested in farming yourself or wanting a deeper knowledge of where your food comes from, you’ll really enjoy this interview with Sarah. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:32:04 Greg Judy: Leasing Farm Landhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-create-a-1600-acre-farm-with-other-peoples-money-greg-judy/ Sun, 06 Jan 2019 13:22:40 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=12976 Greg Judy went from having $8 in his pocket after a long divorce to now farming over 1,600 acres. In this episode, Greg and I recap how he got started, mistakes he’s made and what he looks for in terms of farm properties. He shares his best tips on negotiating leases, what fencing tools to use and even what type of cattle to raise. Greg Judy went from having $8 in his pocket after a long divorce to now farming over 1,600 acres. In this episode, Greg and I recap how he got started, mistakes he’s made and what he looks for in terms of farm properties. smallfarmnation.com <br /> It’s nice to kick off the year by hearing from Greg Judy. If you’re not familiar with Greg, he’s well-known for two things.<br /> The first reason he’s well known is that he has created a sizable farming operation by first custom grazing other people’s cattle before leasing many different farms. So Greg and I recap how he got started, mistakes he’s made and what he looks for in therms of farm properties. He shares his best tips on negotiating leases, what fencing tools to use and even what type of cattle to raise.<br /> The second reason Greg is well-known to pasture-based farmers is that he practices mob-grazing, or putting lots (and I mean LOTS) of ruminants on a small piece of land and moving them multiple times a day.<br /> With his experience, Greg has a lot to share. So let’s dive right into my discussion with Missouri farmer, Greg Judy. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 53:42 7 Winter Farm Marketing Tipshttps://smallfarmnation.com/focus-on-these-7-farm-marketing-tips-this-winter/ Mon, 10 Dec 2018 02:00:03 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11877 So it’s December and we’re winding down the farm season. Let's take advantage of this time to focus on one of the most strategically important areas of our business—of any business. And that is marketing. In this episode I'll walk you through 7 Farm Marketing tasks you can perform this winter to get your farm in great shape for next year. So it’s December and we’re winding down the farm season. Let's take advantage of this time to focus on one of the most strategically important areas of our business—of any business. And that is marketing. In this episode I'll walk you through 7 Farm Ma... smallfarmnation.com So it’s December and we’re winding down the farm season. While that means we have fewer chores to do, we still have farm chores, right? Frozen water troughs, hay that’s gotta be dished out, pigs still need to be fed and so on.<br /> <br /> But the chore load is definitely reduced this time of year, and that’s a good thing. Because we need to rejuvenate, celebrate the season and recharge our batteries. No doubt about it. So what can we do on these frigid winter days to drive our farm businesses forward. I suspect many of you are looking at seed and hatchery catalogs, or even working on planting calendars.<br /> <br /> But we also need to take advantage of this time to focus on one of the most strategically important areas of our business—of any business. And that is marketing.<br /> <br /> In this episode I'll walk you through 7 Farm Marketing tasks you can perform this winter to get your farm in great shape for next year. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 17:11 A huge email list mistakehttps://smallfarmnation.com/are-you-making-a-huge-mistake-with-your-email-list/ Mon, 03 Dec 2018 04:00:54 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11806 Today I want to cover a critical mistake that almost everyone makes with their email list. Not just farmers, but over 90% of ALL businesses. And I don’t want you to continue making that mistake, so we’re gonna set you on the right path today. Because, as you no doubt know why now, building a thriving, engaged list of email subscribers is hugely important to the success of your business. Today I want to cover a critical mistake that almost everyone makes with their email list. Not just farmers, but over 90% of ALL businesses. And I don’t want you to continue making that mistake, so we’re gonna set you on the right path today. Because, smallfarmnation.com Today I want to cover a critical mistake—a huge mistake that almost everyone makes with their email list. Not just farmers, but I’d say over 90% of ALL businesses. And I don’t want you to continue making that mistake, so we’re gonna set you on the right path today. Because, as you no doubt know why now, building a thriving, engaged list of email subscribers is hugely important to the success of your business. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 15:21 How many farm brands?https://smallfarmnation.com/should-you-have-one-farm-brand-or-many/ Mon, 26 Nov 2018 04:00:33 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11791 So it’s branding week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And we’re going to talk about not just branding, but how many farm brands you should have. So this isn't a super long episode but it is super important. Because farming lends itself to multiple enterprises and multiple products more than any industry I know of. I mean, imagine you raise cows and only cows. Sounds like you have one product, right? Well... So it’s branding week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And we’re going to talk about not just branding, but how many farm brands you should have. So this isn't a super long episode but it is super important. smallfarmnation.com So it’s branding week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And we’re going to talk about not just branding, but how many farm brands you should have. So this isn't a super long episode but it is super important. Because farming lends itself to multiple enterprises and multiple products more than any industry I know of. I mean, imagine you raise cows and only cows. Sounds like you have one product, right? Well...<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 14:07 How to be an entrepreneurhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-be-an-entrepreneur-when-youre-not-one-naturally/ Mon, 19 Nov 2018 04:00:07 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11764 What can you do if you have a business but you’re not a natural entrepreneur? In this farm podcast, I’m gonna show you how to stop working ON your business rather than being a slave to it so you can avoid burnout and realize your entrepreneurial dreams. And I've got a special, awesome download to help you do just that. What can you do if you have a business but you’re not a natural entrepreneur? In this farm podcast, I’m gonna show you how to stop working ON your business rather than being a slave to it so you can avoid burnout and realize your entrepreneurial dreams... smallfarmnation.com What can you do if you have a business but you’re not a natural entrepreneur? Today, I’m gonna show you how to stop working ON your business rather than being a slave to it so you can avoid burnout and realize your entrepreneurial dreams. And I've got a special, awesome download to help you do just that.<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 18:58 How to Create an Email Listhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-create-an-email-customer-list-for-your-farm-podcast/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 04:00:34 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=1609 So it’s marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And one of the challenges I hear most often expressed from small farmers (really any small business, actually), is how difficult it is to create an email list of potential customers. In this episode we'll discuss three keys to putting your list-building efforts on autopilot so you can grow your email list. So it’s marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And one of the challenges I hear most often expressed from small farmers (really any small business, actually), is how difficult it is to create an email list of potential customers. smallfarmnation.com<br /> So it’s marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And one of the challenges I hear most often expressed from small farmers (really any small business, actually), is how difficult it is to create an email list of potential customers. In this episode we'll discuss three keys to putting your list-building efforts on autopilot so you can grow your email list. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 15:17 Website Platform Comparisonhttps://smallfarmnation.com/what-is-the-best-website-platform-for-your-farm-business/ Mon, 05 Nov 2018 04:00:00 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11743 It’s online marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And this week we’re talking websites, or, more specifically, what website design tool you should use. And we have plenty of options, right? There’s lots of website builders out there—you know, Squarespace, Wix, Weebly, GoDaddy, and WordPress. I'll walk you through all the options and help you decide what's right for your farm business. It’s online marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And this week we’re talking websites, or, more specifically, what website design tool you should use. And we have plenty of options, right? There’s lots of website builders out there—you... smallfarmnation.com It’s online marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And this week we’re talking websites, or, more specifically, what website design tool you should use. And we have plenty of options, right? There’s lots of website builders out there—you know, Squarespace, Wix, Weebly, GoDaddy, and WordPress. I'll walk you through all the options and help you decide what's right for your farm business. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 29:46 Logo design mistakeshttps://smallfarmnation.com/mistakes-to-avoid-when-designing-your-farm-logo/ Mon, 29 Oct 2018 04:00:03 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11720 What do most people think of when they think of branding? They think of logos. In fact, many people think that their logo is their brand. And you can’t have a great brand without a super cool logo design, can you? Today, I’m gonna tell you the mistakes you’re making with your farm logo design and what you really should be doing, instead. What do most people think of when they think of branding? They think of logos. In fact, many people think that their logo is their brand. And you can’t have a great brand without a super cool logo design, can you? Today, smallfarmnation.com What do most people think of when they think of branding? They think of logos. In fact, many people think that their logo is their brand. And you can’t have a great brand without a super cool logo design, can you? Today, I’m gonna tell you the mistakes you’re making with your farm logo design and what you really should be doing, instead. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 19:28 One-Page Farm Business Planhttps://smallfarmnation.com/this-is-what-your-farm-needs-not-a-business-plan/ Mon, 22 Oct 2018 04:00:07 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11679 Okay, so it’s strategy week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And nothing says “strategy” more than business planning, so that’s the focus this week. Now, the first thing you're told to do when starting a business is to write a business plan. But should you? Do traditional business plans help? Or is there a better way. Yes, there is a better way, and in this episode I'll walk you through how to create an actionable one-page business plan. Okay, so it’s strategy week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And nothing says “strategy” more than business planning, so that’s the focus this week. Now, the first thing you're told to do when starting a business is to write a business plan. smallfarmnation.com Okay, so it’s strategy week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast. And nothing says “strategy” more than business planning, so that’s the focus this week. Now, the first thing you're told to do when starting a business is to write a business plan. But should you? Do traditional business plans help? Or is there a better way.<br /> Yes, there is a better way, and in this episode I'll walk you through how to create an actionable one-page business plan. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 21:05 10 Reasons Farms Struggle Selling Producthttps://smallfarmnation.com/10-reasons-small-farms-struggle-to-sell-products/ Mon, 15 Oct 2018 04:00:09 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11673 Okay, so it’s Marketing week here on the podcast. And it’s an important episode, and if you’re a farmer, this is gonna really resonate with you. I want to talk about why small farms struggle so much to sell their products. If you’re a small, family farmer, you know what I mean. I've created a list of ten reasons why small farms struggle to sell their products. Listen in and see what you think. Okay, so it’s Marketing week here on the podcast. And it’s an important episode, and if you’re a farmer, this is gonna really resonate with you. I want to talk about why small farms struggle so much to sell their products. If you’re a small, smallfarmnation.com Okay, so it’s Marketing week here on the podcast. And it’s an important episode, and if you’re a farmer, this is gonna really resonate with you.<br /> <br /> I want to talk about why small farms struggle so much to sell their products. If you’re a small, family farmer, you know what I mean.<br /> <br /> I gave this issue a lot of thought, both from my own experiences selling farm products as well as from what I hear from so many other farmers.<br /> <br /> And when I thought it through, I created this list of ten reasons why small farms struggle to sell their products. Listen in and see what you think.<br /> <br /> Now, in this episode I’m going to just go through the list of ten. I’ll tell you what I think the issues are and why they exist. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 19:09 12 Fatal Flaws of Most Websiteshttps://smallfarmnation.com/12-fatal-flaws-of-most-farm-websites/ Mon, 08 Oct 2018 04:00:16 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11664 Okay, so it’s Online Marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast, and we’re gonna discuss the dirty dozen...the 12 Fatal Flaws of Most Farm Websites. I'd say at least 90% of farm websites commit these sins. Do you? Okay, so it’s Online Marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast, and we’re gonna discuss the dirty dozen...the 12 Fatal Flaws of Most Farm Websites. I'd say at least 90% of farm websites commit these sins. Do you? smallfarmnation.com Okay, so it’s Online Marketing week here on the Small Farm Nation podcast, and we’re gonna discuss the dirty dozen...the 12 Fatal Flaws of Most Farm Websites. I'd say at least 90% of farm websites commit these sins. Do you? Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 15:35 How to Choose a Name for Your Farmhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-choose-a-name-for-your-farm-business/ Mon, 01 Oct 2018 04:00:15 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11643 One of the most common things new farmers stress over is what to name their farm business. Well, in this week's episode I'm going to tell you there are lots of WRONG names to choose, and give you a tool for choosing the right name for your farm. We'll also cover how to choose product names and taglines. One of the most common things new farmers stress over is what to name their farm business. Well, in this week's episode I'm going to tell you there are lots of WRONG names to choose, and give you a tool for choosing the right name for your farm. smallfarmnation.com One of the most common things new farmers stress over is what to name their farm business. Well, in this week's episode I'm going to tell you there are lots of WRONG names to choose, and give you a tool for choosing the right name for your farm. We'll also cover how to choose product names and taglines. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 21:06 Wal-Mart’s NOT the problem. Your business model is!https://smallfarmnation.com/wal-mart-isnt-the-problem-your-farm-business-model-is/ Mon, 24 Sep 2018 04:00:26 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11637 Farmers love to blame Wal-Mart, regulations and unpatriotic consumers as reasons why their farms struggle. But is that really the case? In this episode I explain why it is not the case, and I also share some structural changes I'm making to upcoming podcast episodes. Farmers love to blame Wal-Mart, regulations and unpatriotic consumers as reasons why their farms struggle. But is that really the case? In this episode I explain why it is not the case, and I also share some structural changes I'm making to upcoming po... smallfarmnation.com A few months ago…back in June 2018, I believe, NBC Nightly News ran this piece titled, “Best advice to U.S. dairy farmers? ‘Sell out as fast as you can.’<br /> <br /> The article featured a dairy farmer, Curtis Coombs and his family, of Smithfield Kentucky. It said, and I quote, “All Curtis Coombs wanted was to raise cows and run his family’s dairy farm in this slice of Kentucky hill country, less than 35 miles from Louisville. But a few weeks ago, he was forced to sell his milking herd of 82 cows, putting an end to his family’s nearly 70-year dairy business.” <br /> In this episode I explain why Wal-Mart is not the problem. Rather, your farm's business strategy is the problem. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 18:32 Talking Farm Marketing on the Modern Acre Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/talking-farm-marketing-on-the-modern-acre-podcast-2/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 06:54:40 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11684 This week I'd like to introduce you to an awesome new podcast. I really enjoyed my conversation with Tim and Tyler Nuss of the Modern Acre podcast recently. If you haven't heard their podcast, here's your chance. Then hit their site and subscribe. This week I'd like to introduce you to an awesome new podcast. I really enjoyed my conversation with Tim and Tyler Nuss of the Modern Acre podcast recently. If you haven't heard their podcast, here's your chance. Then hit their site and subscribe. smallfarmnation.com So, of course, Small Farm Nation is far from the only agricultural podcast out there. I’m sure you have other favorites.<br /> <br /> But I’d like to introduce you to a rather new one if you don’t listen to them already. It’s the Modern Acre podcast hosted by Tim and Tyler Nuss.<br /> <br /> The Nuss brothers, nothing but Nuss on the Modern Acre podcast.<br /> <br /> Recently I had a fun conversation on their podcast and they’ve given me permission to share that episode with you, so I’ll do that today. And if you enjoy the episode, head over to their site at themodernacre.co and subscribe to their episodes.<br /> <br /> I really enjoyed my talk with Tim and Tyler because I felt a kinship. I mean, if you read the “about” section of their website, you’ll see they have one foot deeply planted in agriculture, as they both have farming backgrounds and are involved with farming and food businesses now.<br /> <br /> But they have another foot deeply planted in the business world. Tyler has worked at Apple and in tech startups, and Tim studied international business before joining one of the larger produce marketers in the U.S.<br /> <br /> And you know how much I enjoy blending the business side of farming with the romantic, pastoral side, so this was a fun interview.<br /> <br /> In the interview we discussed:<br /> <br /> how I got into farming<br /> how our pasture-based livestock farm grew<br /> go to market approaches for farming<br /> using employees and apprentices on our farm<br /> the Small Farm Nation Academy<br /> common marketing mistakes farmers make<br /> and much more<br /> I think you’ll get a lot out of this interview I did on The Modern Acre podcast, so let’s dive right in. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 46:06 Talking Farm Marketing on the Modern Acre Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/talking-farm-marketing-on-the-modern-acre-podcast/ Mon, 17 Sep 2018 02:00:31 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11611 This week I'd like to introduce you to an awesome new podcast. I really enjoyed my conversation with Tim and Tyler Nuss of the Modern Acre podcast recently. If you haven't heard their podcast, here's your chance. Then hit their site and subscribe. This week I'd like to introduce you to an awesome new podcast. I really enjoyed my conversation with Tim and Tyler Nuss of the Modern Acre podcast recently. If you haven't heard their podcast, here's your chance. Then hit their site and subscribe. smallfarmnation.com So, of course, Small Farm Nation is far from the only agricultural podcast out there. I’m sure you have other favorites.<br /> <br /> But I’d like to introduce you to a rather new one if you don’t listen to them already. It’s the Modern Acre podcast hosted by Tim and Tyler Nuss.<br /> <br /> The Nuss brothers, nothing but Nuss on the Modern Acre podcast.<br /> <br /> Recently I had a fun conversation on their podcast and they’ve given me permission to share that episode with you, so I’ll do that today. And if you enjoy the episode, head over to their site at themodernacre.co and subscribe to their episodes.<br /> <br /> I really enjoyed my talk with Tim and Tyler because I felt a kinship. I mean, if you read the “about” section of their website, you’ll see they have one foot deeply planted in agriculture, as they both have farming backgrounds and are involved with farming and food businesses now.<br /> <br /> But they have another foot deeply planted in the business world. Tyler has worked at Apple and in tech startups, and Tim studied international business before joining one of the larger produce marketers in the U.S.<br /> <br /> And you know how much I enjoy blending the business side of farming with the romantic, pastoral side, so this was a fun interview.<br /> <br /> In the interview we discussed:<br /> <br /> how I got into farming<br /> how our pasture-based livestock farm grew<br /> go to market approaches for farming<br /> using employees and apprentices on our farm<br /> the Small Farm Nation Academy<br /> common marketing mistakes farmers make<br /> and much more<br /> I think you’ll get a lot out of this interview I did on The Modern Acre podcast, so let’s dive right in. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 46:06 Talking Pastured Poultry with John Suscovichhttps://smallfarmnation.com/talking-pastured-poultry-with-john-suscovich/ Mon, 10 Sep 2018 02:00:09 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11591 In this episode, I talk with John Suscovich of Farm Marketing Solutions. We discuss John's new book on Marketing Pastured Poultry, how to start a pastured poultry business, the critical success factors to achieving profitability and much more. And, of course, we discuss what Howard Stern has in common with pastured poultry. In this episode, I talk with John Suscovich of Farm Marketing Solutions. We discuss John's new book on Marketing Pastured Poultry, how to start a pastured poultry business, the critical success factors to achieving profitability and much more. And, smallfarmnation.com In this episode I'd like to share an excerpt of my Mastermind interview with John Suscovich of Farm Marketing Solutions. John has just published a new book on Marketing Pastured Poultry, and we discussed key parts of that book in this episode.<br /> <br /> In this excerpt, John and I discuss:<br /> <br /> What Howard Stern and pastured poultry have in common<br /> What a pastured poultry business is<br /> The investor reasons for starting a pastured poultry business<br /> How much land is needed for a pasture poultry business<br /> How John took the "Forrest Gump" approach to pastured poultry<br /> The critical success factors for running a pastured poultry business<br /> How a new farmer should go about building an email list<br /> John and I had a great talk. He's a wealth of inspiration and knowledge and I think you'll get a lot out of it. Of course, the entire hour-long mastermind is available in the Small Farm Nation Academy. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 25:50 Random Acts of Marketinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/random-acts-of-marketing/ Mon, 03 Sep 2018 02:00:09 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11480 Today I want to discuss a crisis in small business. A crisis in most businesses, actually, but particularly in farm businesses. It’s a problem that creates undue stress, panic and results in farmers not building their brands, getting enough customers and growing their farm business. I’m talking about Random Acts of Marketing. Today I want to discuss a crisis in small business. A crisis in most businesses, actually, but particularly in farm businesses. It’s a problem that creates undue stress, panic and results in farmers not building their brands, smallfarmnation.com Today I want to discuss a crisis in small business. A crisis in most businesses, actually, but particularly in farm businesses. It’s a problem that creates undue stress, panic and results in farmers not building their brands, getting enough customers and growing their farm business.<br /> <br /> I’m talking about Random Acts of Marketing. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 25:04 Announcing the Small Farm Nation Academyhttps://smallfarmnation.com/announcing-the-small-farm-nation-academy/ Mon, 27 Aug 2018 02:00:56 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11489 Where oh where can you go to learn all the skills you need to market your farm business? Today I’m going to tell you about the greatest farm tool you can invest in this year, the one that will help you to get growing! A membership site full of training videos, Mastermind interviews and resources to teach you how to market your farm business. Where oh where can you go to learn all the skills you need to market your farm business? Today I’m going to tell you about the greatest farm tool you can invest in this year, the one that will help you to get growing! smallfarmnation.com Where oh where can you go to learn all the skills you need to market your farm business? Today I’m going to tell you about the greatest farm tool you can invest in this year, the one that will help you to get growing! A membership site full of training videos, Mastermind interviews and resources to teach you how to market your farm business. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 23:26 Why Your Farm Needs Great Brand Recognitionhttps://smallfarmnation.com/why-your-farm-needs-great-brand-recognition/ Mon, 20 Aug 2018 02:00:16 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11476 Is branding important for your farm business? Let’s start with what I mean by the word “brand” because it’s a word that we hear often, but we may not understand the meaning.  I mean, what does the word “brand” mean anyway? Is branding important for your farm business? - Let’s start with what I mean by the word “brand” because it’s a word that we hear often, but we may not understand the meaning.  I mean, what does the word “brand” mean anyway? smallfarmnation.com Big businesses spend a fortune building their brands. But is branding important for your farm business? Today, I’m here to tell you that it absolutely is critical to build your farm brand, and I’ll explain why.<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 17:25 Foundations for Farm & Local Food Marketinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/foundations-for-farm-local-food-marketing/ Mon, 13 Aug 2018 02:00:05 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11473 So what’s the secret to marketing farm and local food products? Today, I’ll tell you, and set you on a solid foundation for marketing your farm and/or food products. Because, if we produce great food and farm products and there’s no one to buy it, what’s the point? So what’s the secret to marketing farm and local food products? Today, I’ll tell you, and set you on a solid foundation for marketing your farm and/or food products. Because, if we produce great food and farm products and there’s no one to buy it, smallfarmnation.com So what’s the secret to marketing farm and local food products? Today, I’ll tell you, and set you on a solid foundation for marketing your farm and/or food products. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 13:36 11 Farm Business Ruleshttps://smallfarmnation.com/rules-for-starting-a-successful-farm-business/ Mon, 06 Aug 2018 02:00:12 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=1601 Serving the local food community and reconnecting heritage breed animals to neglected farmland was, and is, a worthy pursuit, and it's one that a growing number of people are drawn to. If you're one of those people, that's awesome, and I encourage you to follow your dream. Serving the local food community and reconnecting heritage breed animals to neglected farmland was, and is, a worthy pursuit, and it's one that a growing number of people are drawn to. - If you're one of those people, that's awesome, Many people dream of starting a sustainable family farm, but what are the keys to having a successful farm business?<br /> <br /> In this episode, I share my 11 business rules for starting and running a successful farm business. 11 may seem like an arbitrary number, but I think you'll find these to be compelling rules for starting and running a family farm business.<br /> <br /> I dive into all aspects of the business side of starting and running a farm business, covering:<br /> <br /> competitive differentiation and farm business strategy<br /> farm go-to-market approaches<br /> debt and farming<br /> bridging the gap between what the land needs and what the market needs<br /> understanding the impact a farm business has on family relationships<br /> balancing profit with passion<br /> understanding the critical difference between profit margins and cash flow<br /> when to start marketing your farm business<br /> Plus, in rule #10, which I'm sure will be the most controversial of the 11 rules, I give a piece of advice you rarely hear elsewhere. But I think it's critical to your success, if you truly want to have a profitable farm business. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 36:01 Interview with Greg Gunthorp of Gunthorp Farmshttps://smallfarmnation.com/interview-with-greg-gunthorp-of-gunthorp-farms/ Mon, 30 Jul 2018 06:00:07 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11179 Each month, I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy. They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take. In this episode, I’m gonna share some highlights of my discussion with Greg Gunthorp of Gunthorp Farms in Indiana. 2018 marks Greg’s 20th year as a successful sustainable farmer. This year he’ll raise and market well over 100,000 poultry in addition to 2,500 pigs. Tune in as Greg and I discuss: how to process and wax ducks, what poultry processing equipment to use, how to sell farm products to restaurants, how to pitch products to chefs, what chefs look for in terms of consistency, building a meat smoking/curing facility, financing a farm business, managing the wholesale order process, the most profitable farm distribution channels, much more! So listen in, now. Thanks for Listening! To share your thoughts: Leave a comment in the Farm Marketing Group on Facebook. Share this show on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn To help the show: PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Small Farm Nation on iTunes. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Credits/Resources Relevant to This Episode Farming for You lyrics by Tim Young Buy the rock classic, Stuck in the Middle With You by Stealer's Wheel on Amazon Thanks for listening. Until next time! OTHER WAYS TO ENJOY THIS EPISODE Download on iTunes Each month, I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy. They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take. Show notes at smallfarmnation.com - Each month, I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy.<br /> <br /> They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take.<br /> <br /> In this episode, I’m gonna share some highlights of my discussion with Greg Gunthorp of Gunthorp Farms in Indiana.<br /> <br /> 2018 marks Greg’s 20th year as a successful sustainable farmer. This year he’ll raise and market well over 100,000 poultry in addition to 2,500 pigs. Tune in as Greg and I discuss:<br /> <br /> how to process and wax ducks, <br /> what poultry processing equipment to use,<br /> how to sell farm products to restaurants,<br /> how to pitch products to chefs,<br /> what chefs look for in terms of consistency, <br /> building a meat smoking/curing facility,<br /> financing a farm business,<br /> managing the wholesale order process,<br /> the most profitable farm distribution channels,<br /> much more! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 25:28 Interview with Jordan & Laura Greenhttps://smallfarmnation.com/interview-with-jordan-laura-green/ Mon, 23 Jul 2018 14:05:47 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=11130 Each month,I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy. They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take. In this episode, I’m gonna share some highlights of my discussion with Jordan & Laura Green of J&L Green Farm in Virginia. The Green's have built a fast-growing pasture-based meat business and, get this...they don't even own a single acre of farmland. We discuss: how they started their farm farm investors, partners and contractual relationships the pros and cons of selling at farmers markets why J&L Green Farm hasn't aggressively pursued selling to restaurants logistical issues shipping frozen meat products delivering farm products via drop sites (or metropolitan buying clubs) and so much more that relates to marketing and running a farm business So listen in, now. Thanks for Listening! To share your thoughts: Leave a comment in the Farm Marketing Group on Facebook. Share this show on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn To help the show: PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Small Farm Nation on iTunes. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Credits/Resources Relevant to This Episode Farming for You lyrics by Tim Young Buy the rock classic, Stuck in the Middle With You by Stealer's Wheel on Amazon Thanks for listening. Until next time! OTHER WAYS TO ENJOY THIS EPISODE Download on iTunes Each month,I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy. They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take. Show notes at smallfarmnation.com - Each month,I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy.<br /> <br /> They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take.<br /> <br /> In this episode, I’m gonna share some highlights of my discussion with Jordan & Laura Green of J&L Green Farm in Virginia.<br /> <br /> The Green's have built a fast-growing pasture-based meat business and, get this...they don't even own a single acre of farmland.<br /> <br /> We discuss:<br /> <br /> how they started their farm<br /> farm investors, partners and contractual relationships<br /> the pros and cons of selling at farmers markets<br /> why J&L Green Farm hasn't aggressively pursued selling to restaurants<br /> logistical issues shipping frozen meat products<br /> delivering farm products via drop sites (or metropolitan buying clubs)<br /> and so much more that relates to marketing and running a farm business<br /> So listen in, now. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 23:34 How to Overcoming Farm Price Objectionshttps://smallfarmnation.com/4-steps-to-overcoming-farm-price-objections/ Mon, 16 Jul 2018 15:54:50 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2751 We all know that sustainably produced food is more expensive than supermarket food, so how do we explain that when challenged? This week I want to discuss a challenge that many small farmers face.  It’s one that they seem to all dread and it puts them on the defensive. It’s the whole issue of defending why their products cost so much. Or, at least seems to cost so much. Now, this is a real issue for many of us, so it’s not one we should run from. We need to be prepared to face this head on, and the better you get at this, the more it will become a non-issue. Why is that? Because, as your skill improves at conveying value, that skill will permeate all aspects of your marketing. Your blog posts, your social media updates, what you say on your website and in your email marketing. You’ll become proficient at conveying value and focusing on benefits, rather than being defensive. Before we dive in, I want you to understand something. The Dollar Store shopper isn’t your farm's customer. Or at least not for most of you. You’re not running blue light specials. I want you to understand that price objection is a good sign because it’s usually a buying signal. The prospective customer wants to buy but needs to rationalize this objection. And it’s your job to help them do just that. And in this episode, I explain how to do that. Validate with empathy. Normalize the objection. Paint a farm picture. Sell value. So here’s how it works with my director’s commentary, so to speak: The customer says, why is the chicken so expensive? “You’re right. If you’re comparing the price of our chicken to a chicken in a supermarket it seems ours costs more.” (I validated with empathy. But notice I used the word “seems.” It seems ours costs more. That’s to implant a subliminal message that perhaps the cost isn’t more. Now I want to normalize the objection, so I continue.) “And you know, I had two customers on a recent farm tour who were concerned about the price at first, just as you are now.” (now to paint a farm picture) So I walked them to the brood house and let them see the baby chicks. While we were there, they watched me fill their feeders, by hand, and check their water. We then walked out to the pasture and saw the chickens scratching for bugs in their chicken tractors. I explained how my wife and I built those tractors ourselves, and showed how we pulled them forward every day. I let one of the customers try and pull the tractor forward but she wasn’t quite ready for the workout. But it gave her a real sense of two things. The physical effort we put into raising these birds by hand, and the utter enjoyment these birds feel by soaking up sun, scratching earth and chasing insects. (this is me painting a vivid picture. Now I need to sell value). Like you, I couldn’t understand why good food cost more when I first started out. But it all makes sense for me now.  I mean, a handcrafted knife is more valued and more costly to produce than a mass-produced one, right? Therefore, it costs more. Likewise, our chickens are hand fed, hand watered and hand processed on farm by our family. It’s a handcrafted, ethical product from start to finish. So of course it costs more than a supermarket chicken, but it’s not remotely the same product.  And I strongly feel that a chicken deserves a chance to be a chicken. Don’t you? And this is where you stay silent. Which, let’s face it…can be really hard. But do it. Stay silent and let the customer respond when you say, “don’t you?” So, here’s the whole conversation again, without any commentary on my part. The customer says, why is the chicken so expensive? “You’re right. If you’re comparing the price of our chicken to a chicken in a supermarket it seems ours cost more.” “And you know, I had two customers on a recent farm tour who were concerned about the price at first, just as you are now.” So I walked them to the brood house and let them see the baby chicks. We all know that sustainably produced food is more expensive than supermarket food, so how do we explain that when challenged? This week I want to discuss a challenge that many small farmers face.  It’s one that they seem to all dread and it puts them... smallfarmnationacademy.com We all know that sustainably produced food is more expensive than supermarket food, so how do we explain that when challenged?<br /> <br /> This week I want to discuss a challenge that many small farmers face.  It’s one that they seem to all dread and it puts them on the defensive.<br /> <br /> It’s the whole issue of defending why their products cost so much. Or, at least seems to cost so much.<br /> <br /> Now, this is a real issue for many of us, so it’s not one we should run from. We need to be prepared to face this head on, and the better you get at this, the more it will become a non-issue.<br /> <br /> Why is that?<br /> <br /> Because, as your skill improves at conveying value, that skill will permeate all aspects of your marketing.<br /> <br /> Your blog posts, your social media updates, what you say on your website and in your email marketing.<br /> <br /> You’ll become proficient at conveying value and focusing on benefits, rather than being defensive.<br /> <br /> Before we dive in, I want you to understand something.<br /> <br /> The Dollar Store shopper isn’t your farm's customer. Or at least not for most of you. You’re not running blue light specials.<br /> <br /> I want you to understand that price objection is a good sign because it’s usually a buying signal.<br /> <br /> The prospective customer wants to buy but needs to rationalize this objection.<br /> <br /> And it’s your job to help them do just that.<br /> <br /> And in this episode, I explain how to do that. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 14:53 Interview with urban farmer Curtis Stonehttps://smallfarmnation.com/interview-with-urban-farmer-curtis-stone/ Mon, 09 Jul 2018 14:05:16 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=10775 Each month,I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy. They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take. In this episode, I’m gonna share some highlights of my discussion with Curtis Stone. Curtis is well known for maximizing farming profits on small, urban lots, and has helped lots of folks to do the same thing. Whether you’re interested in urban or rural farming, I think you’ll get a lot out of this. So listen in, now. Thanks for Listening! To share your thoughts: Leave a comment in the Farm Marketing Group on Facebook. Share this show on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn To help the show: PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Small Farm Nation on iTunes. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Credits/Resources Relevant to This Episode Farming for You lyrics by Tim Young Buy the rock classic, Stuck in the Middle With You by Stealer's Wheel on Amazon Thanks for listening. Until next time! OTHER WAYS TO ENJOY THIS EPISODE Download on iTunes Each month,I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy. They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take. Show notes at smallfarmnation.com - Each month,I conduct a mastermind interview for members of the Small Farm Nation Academy.<br /> <br /> They’re video calls between me and an expert in matters that relate to growing a profitable farming business, and they tend to be an hour long, give or take.<br /> <br /> In this episode, I’m gonna share some highlights of my discussion with Curtis Stone.<br /> <br /> Curtis is well known for maximizing farming profits on small, urban lots, and has helped lots of folks to do the same thing.<br /> <br /> Whether you’re interested in urban or rural farming, I think you’ll get a lot out of this.<br /> <br /> So listen in, now. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 23:07 What farmers need to know about 2018 Facebook changeshttps://smallfarmnation.com/what-farmers-need-to-know-about-2018-facebook-newsfeed-changes/ Mon, 02 Jul 2018 20:39:24 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=8025 Facebook is now focused not on the brands…or those of you who have farm Facebook pages, but rather focused on the individual FB user. Learn how to use Facebook effectively with the end in mind. And the end is getting people to conduct a transaction with you. Facebook is now focused not on the brands…or those of you who have farm Facebook pages, but rather focused on the individual FB user. - Learn how to use Facebook effectively with the end in mind. And the end is getting people to conduct a transaction... Show notes at smallfarmnation.com - So you jumped on the band wagon and created a Facebook page, but no one is responded to your posts, right? In this episode I walk you through the 2018 Facebook newsfeed algorithm change and tell you how to survive the social media circus.<br /> <br /> Facebook has yet again made significant changes to its algorithm, and this is a big one. Facebook is now focused not on the brands…or those of you who have farm Facebook pages, but rather focused on the individual FB user.<br /> <br /> Mark Zuckerberg flat out said, "We're making a major change to how we build Facebook. I'm changing the goal I give our product teams from focusing on helping you find relevant content to helping you have more meaningful social interactions. The first changes you'll see will be in News Feed, where you can expect to see more from your friends, family and groups.”<br /> <br /> As if you weren't already struggling enough, right? Getting people to read or engage with your posts.<br /> <br /> Okay, with all these Facebook newsfeed changes, am I suggesting you give up on Facebook.<br /> <br /> No, of course not, for the simple reason that many of your customers are there.<br /> <br /> And lots of potential customers are there that you’ve yet to engage with.<br /> <br /> But, the mistake a lot of people made—farmers and non-farmers—is they focused on building a following on Facebook and DID NOT get those followers onto their email lists.<br /> <br /> So, as I’ve now said many times over the past few years, they built their house on rented land.<br /> <br /> And the landlord, Facebook, has changed the lease terms once again.<br /> <br /> So what this all means is that we have to become much better at creating marketing funnels.<br /> <br /> In this episode I walk you through the five key takeaways of this change and strategies you'll need to execute unless you want to become a Facebook dinosaur. So listen in, now. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 20:48 Email List Building 101 For Farmershttps://smallfarmnation.com/email-list-building-101-farmers/ Mon, 25 Jun 2018 02:00:46 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=7784 An email list is your most important communication asset, and email marketing is a great way to sell your farm products. But how do you build a list in the first place? In this episode I walk you through the four not-so-simple steps of email list building for your farm business. An email list is your most important communication asset, and email marketing is a great way to sell your farm products. But how do you build a list in the first place? - In this episode I walk you through the four not-so-simple steps of email list b... Show notes at smallfarmnation.com - Email marketing is a great way to sell your farm products, but how do you build a list in the first place? In this episode I walk you through the four not-so-simple steps of email list building for your farm business.<br /> <br /> You’ve heard it many times, but an email list is your most important communication asset. It’s the best way for you to control getting a message directly to your customers.<br /> <br /> But most farm websites do an awful job of list building.<br /> <br /> I mean, list building comes down to four simple steps.<br /> <br /> have a place to capture emails.<br /> drive traffic to that place<br /> give people a great reason to sign-up<br /> give subscribers a way and reason to share<br /> Of course, successful list building is much more detailed than that and requires tools and know how.<br /> <br /> I just covered all this in an 11-video course on list building. That was released to the Small Farm Nation Academy just this month.<br /> <br /> But what you can do now to review how you’re doing with those four steps?<br /> <br /> Listen in as I guide you through how to grow your farm's email list! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 20:37 7 Reason Why Small Farms Failhttps://smallfarmnation.com/7-reason-why-small-farms-fail/ Mon, 18 Jun 2018 02:00:21 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=7685 Small businesses routinely fail in every industry segment, but what   causes small farms to fail? In this episode I share 7 reasons why small farms fail, so you learn what not to do so that your farm thrives. I'll walk you through seven reasons why small farms fail. Small businesses routinely fail in every industry segment, but what   causes small farms to fail? In this episode I share 7 reasons why small farms fail, so you learn what not to do so that your farm thrives. - Small businesses routinely fail in every industry segment, but what   causes small farms to fail? In this episode I share 7 reasons why small farms fail, so you learn what not to do so that your farm thrives.
So, starting a business is a risky venture, right? And it doesn’t really matter what sector you start a business in.
If you start a restaurant, and insurance or law practice, a car wash or even a marketing agency, there’s a pretty high probability that you’re gonna fail.
That’s just a fact. But let’s just examine the reasons why these business fail. And actually, the agriculture sector has a much lower failure rate after 5 years than most industries.
For example, 50 or more of agriculture businesses are still going after five years, whereas only about 36 of construction businesses make it the long.
So the perception that some have that there’s a high failure rate in small farms isn’t born out by the data.
And one of the reasons that many farming businesses make it that long and go much longer is because they’re subsidized.
Not by the government. But by the farmer, who is most often working a second job so that the farm can work.
And that’s cool if that’s what you want to do. But, again, that’s more of a hobby farm and not really a farming business.
And the point of this episode is to discuss why farming businesses fail and what you can learn from those mistakes.
So let’s get right into them.
Here’s reason number one that small farms fail.
1) They approach it as a lifestyle and not as a business
You see, many people are attracted to farming because they love the notion of the lifestyle. They want to farm or grow produce. Or have a collection of animals, and they want to spend their days in the sunshine, producing something with their hands and being out on the land.
And that’s great.
But is that how you would approach a business opportunity? Is that the opportunity you’d pitch to an investor or a bank?…that you want to go work with your hands in the soil and have some animals?
Of course not!
Because a business approach means identifying the market first.
And that’s very different from what most farmers do, who start simply because they want to grow things. Or produce things like soap, herbs and cheese.
So they treat selling and marketing as an afterthought.
Now, as I’ve said many times, that’s a mistake.
A business is a business because it has customers that buys from it.
So you always start with the market in mind.
There’s an excellent publication for small farmers called “Growing for Market
and the title means just that…produce what the market will buy and that you can sell.
And sell at an attractive profit margin. That means focusing on high value crops and products.
For me, that was artisan cheese, raw milk and grassfed beef. For you it may mean cut flowers, herbs, soaps or what not.
But there are many farm enterprises that aren’t high margin or high value, and that leads me into the second reason why small farms fail.
2) Reason number two is that they choose low-end profit streams
In these cases, the math just doesn’t work, because the farmer chose either a low margin product or is targeting a very cost-conscious consumer.
And while Wal-Mart can pull off that strategy…at least until Amazon buries them…that’s only because they achieved enormous scale, efficiency and supply chain integration.
Those aren’t benefits you’re likely to achieve as a small farmer.
So it’s real difficult in small-scale farming to make it on the price dimension and, let’s be honest here, there’s no business opportunity selling to people who don’t have money.
Just. A. Fact.
So target opportunities with segments who do have disposable income. And select farm enterprises that don’t have such a low barr...]]>
Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean
Farm Law, Liability & How to Protect Your Assetshttps://smallfarmnation.com/farm-law-liability-how-to-protect-your-assets/ Mon, 11 Jun 2018 13:23:10 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=7580 A lot of people dream of starting a family farm and selling directly to customers, but how do you protect yourself from getting sued? In this episode, join me and the Food Lawyer as we discuss farm law, liability and how to protect your personal assets. A lot of people dream of starting a family farm and selling directly to customers, but how do you protect yourself from getting sued? - In this episode, join me and the Food Lawyer as we discuss farm law, A lot of people dream of starting a family farm and selling directly to customers, but how do you protect yourself from getting sued? In this episode, join me and the Food Lawyer, Jason Foscolo, as we discuss farm law, liability and how to protect your personal assets. <br /> <br /> This is part of the mastermind interview I did recently in the Small Farm Nation Academy with Jason Foscolo. We discuss:<br /> <br /> the best legal structure for your farm business.<br /> when a sole proprietorship makes sense versus an LLC.<br /> what do farm lenders look for from the farm business?<br /> the role of insurance, structure and processes to protect your assets.<br /> does a signed agreement with a customer (to purchase raw milk, etc.) actually protect the farmer from liability?<br /> how to choose their farm business name...can you choose the same name as another farm?<br /> managing the legal risk of agritourism events.<br /> the laws surrounding apprentices and interns.<br /> when farm products need a label, and when they don't.<br /> the legality of herd shares and selling meat in butchering classes.<br /> whether a farmer can copy another farmer's raw milk herd share agreement.<br /> when to trademark business and product names.<br /> and much more<br /> Listen in as we give you food for thought on how to legally protect your farming BUSINESS! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 47:10 Do You Have a Farm Business or a Farm Hobby?https://smallfarmnation.com/do-you-have-a-farm-business-or-a-farm-hobby/ Mon, 04 Jun 2018 02:00:10 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=7300 The phrase hobby farm is cute and all, but what’s the difference between a hobby farm and a farming business? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you might have a farm hobby that costs you money rather than a thriving farm business that earns you money. The phrase hobby farm is cute and all, but what’s the difference between a hobby farm and a farming business? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you might have a farm hobby that costs you money rather than a thriving farm business that earns yo... The phrase hobby farm is cute and all, but what’s the difference between a hobby farm and a farming business? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you might have a farm hobby that costs you money rather than a thriving farm business that earns you money.<br /> <br /> So, this topic of understanding the difference between farm hobbies and farm businesses is very important. It’s an issue I’ve see often with small farmers, as they seem to operate partly as a farm business and partly…or mainly, I should say,…as a hobby farm.<br /> <br /> And I understand why this happens when people opt out of other careers for farm life. <br /> <br /> What draws them is the idea of working on the land.<br /> <br /> Of having animals…livestock. Of tending sheep or chickens, collecting eggs, planting seeds, harvesting crops.<br /> <br /> Of growing food under blue skies to the soothing sounds of birds and bees rather than grating sounds of traffic and ambulances.<br /> <br /> And those are all great reasons to embrace farm life.<br /> <br /> But, notice I didn’t mention anything about finances?<br /> <br /> About customers?<br /> <br /> Because folks are rarely lured into this lifestyle by thoughts of, “I’ve got an idea of how to make a boatload of money farming.”<br /> <br /> So, it’s generally not the business plans or finances that lures them to these businesses.<br /> <br /> And that’s a shame, because, as you yourself may already know, these ARE businesses.<br /> <br /> And they’re not immune to the laws of business.<br /> <br /> Namely, they need customers and a sales price that far exceeds the production cost.<br /> <br /> And, that’s how they would approach any other business, right?<br /> <br /> I mean, if someone was stuck in a soul-sucking cubicle job and wanted out, and if they stumbled across an opportunity to start a dry-cleaning operation, wouldn’t they assess it as a business?<br /> <br /> They wouldn’t daydream about folding clothes and cleaning suits.<br /> <br /> No, they’d assess the business model, get confident with their profit projections and marketing strategy before pulling the trigger on the business.<br /> <br /> But this is where farming is different than most businesses.<br /> <br /> Not all, because, I know just as many people who have started restaurants, because the love to cook, as those who started farming, because they love to garden.<br /> <br /> But just because you can cook doesn’t remotely mean you can run a profitable restaurant.<br /> <br /> And ditto for farming.<br /> <br /> Listen in as I help you get on track with your farming BUSINESS! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 14:49 My Interview on Chris Martenson’s Peak Prosperity Podcasthttps://smallfarmnation.com/interview-on-chris-martensons-peak-prosperity-podcast/ Mon, 28 May 2018 02:00:16 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=7416 This week I was a guest on the popular Peak Prosperity podcast. It was a great pleasure speaking with Adam Taggart, who co-founded Peak Prosperity with Chris Martenson. You can listen to the episode here on the Peak Prosperity website, here on iTunes or here on YouTube. We discussed many aspects of starting and running a successful small-scale farming business. If you'd rather read than listen, you can read the entire transcript of the episode, below. Episode Transcript Adam: Hello, and welcome to the Resilient Life podcast. Resilient Life is part of peakprosperity.com. It's where we focus on practical and actionable knowledge for building a better future. I'm your host, Adam Taggart. Many of those looking to live with greater resilience dream of owning productive farmland that's managed sustainably. Now, in the past we've profiled funds like Farmland LP that enable folks to become directly invested in farmland like this, but many aren't interested in simply being passive investors. They want to become farmers to work the land themselves, to grow food to feed their families and their local community. From firsthand knowledge, having in the past being a part owner of a CSA, it's rewarding work and a worthy pursuit, but it's hard. Farming demands more time and toil than most jobs out there, and mother nature's unpredictability always finds a way to up end your best laid plans. So how does one succeed at running a successful small farming operation? Today, we're joined by Tim Young, founder of Small Farm Nation, which offers farmers proven, practical guidance for growing their farm businesses. His first and most important advice: successful small farming is 20 percent about growing and 80 percent about marketing to customers. From his firsthand experience, Tim has observed that is the business side that farms live and die by. And from my own work with small producers in California's Sonoma County where I live, I 100 percent agree with this. But most farmers, especially new ones, are undereducated and under experienced in key business skills.<--more--> Tim's mission is to correct this knowledge deficiency which is why he created the Small Farm Nation Academy, a curriculum and knowledge center that teaches farmers key skills like marketing, accounting, customer management pricing, handling insurance, sales strategy and more. Tim knows what he's talking about. He built and operates and award-winning artisan cheese business, but before doing that he spent 25 years closing large marketing deals in the tech industry. Then he founded an Inc. 500 company. He has learned firsthand which business fundamentals are necessary for small farms to thrive. Tim, thanks so much for joining us today. I think a lot of folks are going to be interested in what you have to tell us. Tim: Thanks, Adam, it's my pleasure. Thanks a lot for having me. Adam: Oh, gosh, it's a real pleasure. And I know that you interviewed Chris for a podcast for the Small Farm Nation, and I know that he really enjoyed that experience, so we're very happy to return the favor today. Tim: Yeah. That was one of our most popular episodes last year. I encourage everyone to check that out. I think a lot of us really admire what you guys are doing in terms of helping people to become more resilient and take preparedness a little bit more seriously. Adam: Well, thanks. I think it's a little bit of a mutual admiration society here because we're big fans of what you're doing too. Tim, why don't we start here by giving our readers a little bit more background into how you transitioned from the world of high tech into becoming an expert on small scale farming. Tim: Yeah. Farming's not in my background at all. I didn't grow up on a farm. I have never really, for the most part, I've never petted a cow or seen a chicken too much close up. I lived in North Georgia growing up and had seen some of that from afar. This week I was a guest on the popular Peak Prosperity podcast. It was a great pleasure speaking with Adam Taggart, who co-founded Peak Prosperity with Chris Martenson. You can listen to the episode here on the Peak Prosperity website, smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week I was a guest on the popular Peak Prosperity podcast. It was a great pleasure speaking with Adam Taggart, who co-founded Peak Prosperity with Chris Martenson. We discussed many aspects of starting and running a successful small-scale farming business, including if you can make money farming, how to market your farm business to earn more customers and command higher prices, how to build your farm brand and, of course, the Small Farm Nation Academy.<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 51:28 How to Build Your Personal Farm Brandhttps://smallfarmnation.com/how-to-build-your-personal-farm-brand/ Mon, 21 May 2018 02:00:09 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=7167 We’ve all heard the term corporate branding, but what is a personal brand, and do farmers need one? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you need to develop your own personal farm brand, and how to do it. Because, from a marketing perspective, a sustainable farm business is quite unique in the scheme of business models. We’ve all heard the term corporate branding, but what is a personal brand, and do farmers need one? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you need to develop your own personal farm brand, and how to do it. Because, from a marketing perspective, We’ve all heard the term corporate branding, but what is a personal brand, and do farmers need one? In this episode, I’m going to tell you why you need to develop your own personal farm brand, and how to do it. Because, from a marketing perspective, a sustainable farm business is quite unique in the scheme of business models.<br /> <br /> Like other businesses (big and small), a sustainable farm business needs to build a strong business brand in order to thrive.<br /> <br /> Yet, the heart of any farm business is, what? <br /> <br /> It’s the FARMER. After all, the farmer is what makes a farm, a farm.<br /> <br /> The best farms are those where the farmer has established something of a personal brand that is just as strong as the farm brand he or she created.<br /> <br /> And, successful farm businesses know that the personal brand is intertwined with the farm brand. In other words, the perception of the farm business mirrors the perception of the farmer.<br /> <br /> But, with over 3 million farms out there, what’s the secret to breaking through and establishing your own farm brand persona?<br /> <br /> This episode outlines 8 tips that can help you to achieve just that, and there's a fantastic free download that will help you to start building your own personal farm brand.<br /> <br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 19:21 The “Ideal Customer” Mythhttps://smallfarmnation.com/ideal-customer-myth/ Mon, 14 May 2018 07:52:01 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=7290 It’s easy to grow your farm or small business, right? Just define your ideal customer and find more like them. Well, today, I’ll put an end to this myth and explain why it’s not about your ideal customer, but rather it’s about YOU!<br /> <br /> You know, it’s frustrating when we start a farm or any new business.<br /> <br /> We hear things like, if you build it they will come.<br /> <br /> Experts advise us to simply define our ideal customer…our avatar, in modern speak, and we’re all set.<br /> <br /> Simple as that.<br /> <br /> But is that really sound advice?<br /> <br /> On first glance, maybe it is.<br /> <br /> I mean, it sounds both simple and logical…just target people who are likely to buy from you.<br /> <br /> So, in theory, it’s one of those things that sounds sensible, so people keep repeating this advice you hear.<br /> <br /> Don’t believe me?<br /> <br /> Just Google “how to identify your ideal customer” and you’ll see millions of results on it.<br /> <br /> But, despite being advice frequently dished out, there’s a big problem with this approach.<br /> <br /> And, actually, in my experience, there are five problems with this approach.<br /> <br /> I cover them in this episode and explain what you should do instead of trying to define a mythical ideal customer.<br /> <br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 17:04 Farming/Homesteading as a Retirement Strategy | Homesteading | Farminghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-30-farminghomesteading-retirement-strategy-homesteading-farming-podcast/ Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:28:28 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2654 When people think of retirement, they often think of golf or travel. But what about homesteading or farming as a retirement strategy? In this final episode of season 1, I’ll share with you how we and many other farmsteaders are thinking very old-school about retirement. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Several years ago as we prepared to transition from sprawling urban life to our rural farmstead, Liz and I were filled with excitement about growing our own food and being immersed in nature. Yet, during that period of intense change and learning we also spent many hours discussing, of all things, retirement. At the time the idea of retirement was many years away for us, but in our “former” lives we at least understood what the plan was, so we rarely thought about it. The plan back then was simply to keep working until we were, I don’t know, 62 or so and then let a 401K or pension plan fund the rest of our lives, perhaps with a little help from social security. But moving to the farm meant that there may be no pension plan and for many people it means converting a 401K or other savings into hard assets such as land. And then, just as we were moving to the farm the “great recession” of 2008 hit. Just like you, we witnessed the economic hardship forced onto so many people as a result of reckless  lending and investments by major lending institutions and equally reckless government spending, which required government bail-outs and central banks intervention to prop up global markets. After that experience, our confidence that pension fund obligations would ever be met had eroded anyway, so we began to consider thinking of retirement planning, and homesteading, in a new way.                         See, the thing is that this whole concept of retirement is a relatively new one. I mean, not so long ago, when we all lived in a more agrarian based society, few people ever retired. Their daily duties just changed. As we grew up we would take over running the farm, until one day when stepped back to let our kids do the same. But that didn’t mean we stopped working. Perhaps we would take over maintenance of the equipment or something less physically demanding, but something that required our knowledge and experience. Or maybe we would help out more inside the home with cooking or childcare. But flat-out retirement to travel or play golf all day was the domain of the ultra rich. And even then, most tycoons were still wheeling and dealing well into their 60s and beyond. And that was when live expectancies were barely 60, so even the rich worked until the end. Nowadays with retirement plans tanking and pension funds bleeding out, we may find ourselves without the ability to retire once again. However, this time, we will not have the farm to feed us and the multi-generational home to keep us occupied and close to our loved ones. For many, if they’re very fortunate they may be able to find a spot in a retirement home and sell their current homes to pay for it. But this whole notion of retirement is flawed, as many people are starting to realize. Even the Harvard Business Review wrote a recent article titled, Why Retirement is a Flawed Concept. The whole notion of retirement as we understand it was invented by the Germans in 1889, when German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck invented the idea of retirement with the Old Age and Disability Insurance Law of 1889, which established the concept for the rest of us. “Those who are disabled from work by age and invalidity have a well-grounded claim to care from the state,” he said at the time. What he wanted was to address high youth unemployment by paying those 70 and older to leave the workforce. Made sense to many, so other countries followed suit with retirement ages around 65 or 70. And those are the ages we’ve all grown up with thinking of as retirement age. But, When people think of retirement, they often think of golf or travel. But what about homesteading or farming as a retirement strategy? In this final episode of season 1, I’ll share with you how we and many other farmsteaders are thinking very old-school... From smallfarmnation.com When people think of retirement, they often think of golf or travel. But what about homesteading or farming as a retirement strategy? In this final episode of season 1, I’ll share with you how we and many other farmsteaders are thinking very old-school about retirement. Several years ago as we prepared to transition from sprawling urban life to our rural farmstead, Liz and I were filled with excitement about growing our own food and being immersed in nature.<br /> <br /> Yet, during that period of intense change and learning we also spent many hours discussing, of all things, retirement.<br /> <br /> At the time the idea of retirement was many years away for us, but in our “former” lives we at least understood what the plan was, so we rarely thought about it.<br /> <br /> The plan back then was simply to keep working until we were, I don’t know, 62 or so and then let a 401K or pension plan fund the rest of our lives, perhaps with a little help from social security.<br /> <br /> But moving to the farm meant that there may be no pension plan and for many people it means converting a 401K or other savings into hard assets such as land.<br /> <br /> And then, just as we were moving to the farm the “great recession” of 2008 hit.<br /> <br /> Just like you, we witnessed the economic hardship forced onto so many people as a result of reckless lending and investments by major lending institutions and equally reckless government spending, which required government bail-outs and central banks intervention to prop up global markets.<br /> <br /> After that experience, our confidence that pension fund obligations would ever be met had eroded anyway, so we began to consider thinking of retirement planning, and homesteading, in a new way.<br /> <br /> Or, actually...an old way.<br /> <br /> You see, the concept of retirement is actually quite new. It's an outdated concept that's collapsing, and I explain why in this episode.<br /> <br /> Grab some coffee or tea, pull up a chair and listen in as we invite you into our world of modern homesteading. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 26:52 Farmstead Update: Shaking the Winter Blues | Homesteading | Farminghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-29-farmstead-update-shaking-winter-blues-homesteading-farming-podcast/ Fri, 24 Mar 2017 08:17:07 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2649 Sign Up Spring has sprung but the grass ain’t ris, and we can’t find where the flowers is. This week, Liz joins me as we shake the winter blues and share an update of what’s happening on the farm. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Welcome to Episode 29! First off, we've received 70 reviews on iTunes, and Liz and I would like to thank each of you for leaving a review. This podcast is a labor of love for us and we greatly appreciate you showing us that it's not a waste of energy. This week Liz is back on the podcast, and she shares a surprising challenge that we've had to deal with in recent months. And that challenge is, boredom. The climate in our new homestead means winter is longer and spring arrives later, so we've really had to adjust to having more time off from garden and farmstead chores. Sounds like a good thing...but it it'll drive you stir crazy. Still, we've got a lot going on, and in this episode we discuss: our recent cruise vacation and how these crazy preppers prepared to spend a week on the ocean clearing land for pasture and putting in a one-acre pond getting laying hens and building a micro-eggmobile a new Dexter calf building a milking parlor for our Jersey cow home milking procedures and raw milk quality hugelkultur and adding compost to raise or not to raise meat rabbits our Tamworth pigs top bar bee hives and adding bees permaculture, plantings and installing a vineyard of Norton grapes expanding the medicinal garden Grab some coffee or tea, pull up a chair and listen in as we invite you into our world of modern homesteading. Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Get the Free eBook: The Self-Sufficient Road Map Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Sign Up Spring has sprung but the grass ain’t ris, and we can’t find where the flowers is. This week, Liz joins me as we shake the winter blues and share an update of what’s happening on the farm. - Listen to the Podcast Welcome to Episode 29! First off, we've received 70 reviews on iTunes, and Liz and I would like to thank each of you for leaving a review. This podcast is a labor of love for us and we greatly appreciate you showing us that it's not a waste of energy.<br /> <br /> This week Liz is back on the podcast, and she shares a surprising challenge that we've had to deal with in recent months. And that challenge is, boredom.<br /> <br /> The climate in our new homestead means winter is longer and spring arrives later, so we've really had to adjust to having more time off from garden and farmstead chores. Sounds like a good thing...but it it'll drive you stir crazy.<br /> <br /> Still, we've got a lot going on, and in this episode we discuss:<br /> <br /> our recent cruise vacation and how these crazy preppers prepared to spend a week on the ocean<br /> clearing land for pasture and putting in a one-acre pond<br /> getting laying hens and building a micro-eggmobile<br /> a new Dexter calf<br /> building a milking parlor for our Jersey cow<br /> home milking procedures and raw milk quality<br /> hugelkultur and adding compost<br /> to raise or not to raise meat rabbits<br /> our Tamworth pigs<br /> top bar bee hives and adding bees<br /> permaculture, plantings and installing a vineyard of Norton grapes<br /> expanding the medicinal garden<br /> Grab some coffee or tea, pull up a chair and listen in as we invite you into our world of modern homesteading. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:00:36 Why We Eat the Animals We Love | Homesteading | Farminghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-28-eat-animals-love-homesteading-farming-podcast/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 08:12:52 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2646 We love animals, so farming livestock was an easy decision for us. So how can we eat the animals we love? Today, I’ll tell you why PETA is dead wrong and why eating the "right" meat is best for people, the environment AND the animals. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn So, of all the decisions we contemplated when we began farming a decade ago, choosing to farm livestock was the easiest. Of course, that meant we would care for livestock, and then eat animals we cared for. We spent years hatching cute little chicks, watching Ossabaw Island piglets being born in the woods, pulling calves, collecting and cleaning eggs, and just watching our cows and sheep graze lush pastures. We’ve loved farm animals since we took our first steps out of the rat race, and we love everything about them. So it seems strange to some folks that we not only eat our animals, but we give them names and develop relationships with them before we do. If that doesn’t make sense to you, let me explain why it does to us. You see, there were four reasons why the path of raising animals for food was so clearly right for us 10 years ago, and continues to be today. The first reason is that we love animals. All animals. One of the things we joked about when we first bought our sprawling acreage was that we could have as many pets as we wanted. My wife, Liz, is attracted to pet stores the way Winnie Mandela is attracted to shoes, so it was easy for us to dream of raising chickens, cows, pigs, sheep and any other animals we could get our hands on. But if you love animals, you can’t eat them…can you? I mean, how Can You Eat the Animals You Love? Our love of animals brings up a paradox for many people and leads into the second reason why we chose to raise (and eat) animals. The paradox is, how could we love an animal and yet kill it for its meat? When it comes to eating meat there is a clear line of division among people. The majority, being products of an environment where meat is cheap and plentiful, think nothing of consuming it. Then there are those who, acting mainly out of what they view as compassion for animals, choose to not eat meat. They derive their protein from other sources and take comfort in their perception that no life is harmed in order for them to eat. In reality, it’s well known that countless lives of insects and mammals are sacrificed to sustain a vegetarian diet. There’s a thought-provoking article on care2.com titled, Do Vegetarians Kill More Animals Than Meat Eaters?The article has over 23,000 comments so, yeah, it was widely read and got people thinking. The article cited  an written by Mike Archer AM, Professor and member of the Evolution of Earth & Life Systems Research Group at University of New South Wales. That article was titled, “Ordering the vegetarian meal? There’s more animal blood on your hands.” According to Archer’s research, he concluded that protein obtained from grazing livestock costs far fewer lives per acre than simply growing grains. Therefore, he concluded that it is a more humane, ethical and environmentally-friendly dietary option. If you eat meat, you’ll probably agree, and if you don’t, you’ll vehemently disagree, right? But let’s get back to our reasons. To my way of thinking, even though vegetarians often tout perceived health benefits of their diet, the health benefits are not the reason they originally sought a diet free of meat. Rather the decision was based on moral grounds, and it is these values that are put forth as a moral challenge to the world’s meat eaters with the claim that it is unethical to eat meat. If you look closely at the reasons cited, vegans indeed have a point worthy of consideration. After all, the factory-farmed animals that give their lives for our dining pleasure endure, by most definitions, horrid existences. Laying hens packed in battery cages unable to ever spread thei... We love animals, so farming livestock was an easy decision for us. So how can we eat the animals we love? Today, I’ll tell you why PETA is dead wrong and why eating the "right" meat is best for people, the environment AND the animals. smallfarmnation.com <br /> We love animals, so farming livestock was an easy decision for us. So how can we eat the animals we love? Today, I’ll tell you why PETA is dead wrong and why eating the "right" meat is best for people, the environment AND the animals.<br /> So, of all the decisions we contemplated when we began farming a decade ago, choosing to farm livestock was the easiest.<br /> <br /> Of course, that meant we would care for livestock, and then eat animals we cared for.<br /> <br /> We spent years hatching cute little chicks, watching Ossabaw Island piglets being born in the woods, pulling calves, collecting and cleaning eggs, and just watching our cows and sheep graze lush pastures.<br /> <br /> We’ve loved farm animals since we took our first steps out of the rat race, and we love everything about them.<br /> <br /> So it seems strange to some folks that we not only eat our animals, but we give them names and develop relationships with them before we do.<br /> <br /> If that doesn’t make sense to you, let me explain why it does to us.<br /> <br /> You see, there were four reasons why the path of raising animals for food was so clearly right for us 10 years ago, and continues to be today.<br /> <br /> Grab some coffee or tea, pull up a chair and listen in as I share why PETA is dead wrong, and why the best decision for the land, the eaters AND the animals, is to eat them. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 23:56 23 Questions to Ask Before Buying Rural Land | Homesteading | Farminghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-27-23-questions-ask-buying-rural-land-homesteading-farming-podcast/ Fri, 10 Mar 2017 08:09:00 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2644 When you search for rural land you’ll find all sorts of places that look promising. But how do you know if you’ve found your dream property? Today, I’ll share what we’ve learned and cover the 23 questions you should answer before buying that rural property. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn So, Liz and I have bought rural property twice now. It’s both an exciting and exhausting time, Before you plunk down that deposit on the first rural property that screams your name, consider this: you are planning to make a move there for life. A new life, a better life and, perhaps, not only the rest of your life but a homestead that future generations will cherish. So, yeah, it’s appropriate to take time and weigh the decision against criteria that are important to you and your family. With that in mind, I’ve come up with a list of 23 important questions you should ask and answer when looking for rural property. But, really, these 23 questions are more like 23 categories. As you’ll hear, each question…or category…has many sub-questions, so it’s way more than 23 questions. So, having said that, let’s get going on our list of 23 questions to ask when looking for rural property. 1. How much land do you really need? This gets to the issue of land lust, as we all seem to want more land and more privacy. But the question you’ll need to answer is how much land do you actually need to achieve your goals or dream? I mean, if you simply want to have a garden and some chickens you can certainly homestead on less than an acre.  Many people do. But what if you want livestock, such as cows and horses?  How about orchards? Do you want to be able to hunt on your own land…do you want a lake or pond for recreation and fishing? The risk here is that you, like us, will say…yeah, I want all that, and more. But of course all that comes at a cost, both financially and in terms of upkeep. So you have to be clear on your goals, because keeping chickens and rabbits require very little land, sheep and goats require a little more and cows require, at a minimum, one or two acres of dedicated pasture each… and that is IF you are in good pasture/rainfall areas typical of the eastern United States. In much of the western parts of the U.S. more land is usually required, often much more. And if you are thinking about having horses, get far more rural property—10 acres per horse (in the east) in addition to your house, driveway, garden, etc. Okay, moving on. Question # 2. Can you COMFORTABLY afford the land? Only you know how much you can afford for the home and land. Can you purchase your rural property and be debt-free?  You’ve heard me talk about this before so you know I think this is a really important milestone to achieve. But, if you’re not there yet, can you comfortably afford the down payment with plenty of financial reserves left over to deal with the unexpected? And I mean plenty, because there’s always a need for money out here. For instance, how much will any improvements to the land or buildings cost? Then there’s the cost for livestock, trees and garden beds and so on. So make sure your purchase leaves you with financial reserves. # 3. How is the water? Does the land have excellent water? (I encourage you to make this a very high priority.) Does the water come from a natural spring or has a well been drilled? If it is a spring, is it located above the elevation of the house and garden so you can use gravity for water distribution? If the water is from a well, how many gallons per minute does it produce AND what is the static water depth? For example, on our last farm, we had two wells, each 300 feet deep that produced over 45 gallons per minute, but the static water depth is less than 40 feet. On my current homestead we only have one well that produces about 5 gallons per minute, but that’s plenty. Besides, When you search for rural land you’ll find all sorts of places that look promising. But how do you know if you’ve found your dream property? Today, I’ll share what we’ve learned and cover the 23 questions you should answer before buying that rural prop... When you search for rural land you’ll find all sorts of places that look promising. But how do you know if you’ve found your dream property? Today, I’ll share what we’ve learned and cover the 23 questions you should answer before buying that rural property.<br /> <br /> Welcome to Episode 27! So, Liz and I have bought rural property twice now.<br /> <br /> It’s both an exciting and exhausting time, but before you plunk down that deposit on the first rural property that screams your name, consider this: you are planning to make a move there for life.<br /> <br /> A new life, a better life and, perhaps, not only the rest of your life but a homestead that future generations will cherish.<br /> <br /> So, yeah, it’s appropriate to take time and weigh the decision against criteria that are important to you and your family.<br /> <br /> With that in mind, I’ve come up with a list of 23 important questions you should ask and answer when looking for rural property.<br /> <br /> But, really, these 23 questions are more like 23 categories.<br /> <br /> As you’ll hear in this episode, each question…or category…has many sub-questions, so it’s way more than 23 questions.<br /> <br /> Listen into this episode as I walk you through the 23 Questions to Ask Before Buying Rural Land. So, if you're looking for ways to tips and inspiration to become more self-sufficient, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 39:20 10 Survival Lessons From the Great Depression | Homesteading | Farminghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-26-10-survival-lessons-great-depression-homesteading-farming-podcast/ Fri, 03 Mar 2017 07:58:59 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2636 Many people believe that The Great Depression was a hard time for all Americans, but is that true? This week, I’ll tackle that myth and share 10 Survival Lessons from The Great Depression era. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn So, we all grew up reading and hearing about The Great Depression, right? That time in American history when times were tough, everyone was thrown out of work, food was scarce. On top of that we had the Dust Bowl with infertile land and tremendous storms of dust blanketing the heartland of the country. And, of course, virtually no one had money. Sounds like a made-for-TV nightmare that’s almost beyond belief. But—as terrible as that time was, was it really terrible for everyone? I ask, because sometimes the impact of events is often exaggerated when recalled, whether it be a personal or societal event. And, even if it is horrific, what percentage of the population is it horrific for? Just a few years ago, from 2007-2009, we had what we’re now calling the Great Recession. That’s when the 8 trillion dollar housing bubble burst. It led to a big reduction in jobs and consumer spending but, to be honest, I didn’t have much of an impact on my family. We were farming at the time, selling pasture based meats direct to consumers who still were hungry and could afford to eat. And, the truth is, while many people lost paper money during those years, the unemployment rate peaked at under 11%, meaning that over 88% of people could find jobs. It’s true that perhaps maybe not the jobs they wanted, and it may also be true that the real unemployment rate was considerably higher, when you factor in people who gave up looking. But the point I’m making is that it’s often a common misconception that times are harder than they actually were. I found that to be the case for The Great Depression when I listened to the audiobook, Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression. In it, author Mildred Armstrong Kalish recounts her childhood fondly as she retells many stories of what it was like to live through hard times.  Funny thing though; like many who lived pretty self-sufficient lifestyles, she wasn’t aware that there were hard times. Of course now, those who lived in the cities and depended on paychecks fared far worse than Mildred’s family. And, while a small number of people remained wealthy, being able to provide for oneself made the family much better off since stocks and bonds became worth far less and money was very tight. As a modern homesteader, I’ve thought a lot about those times and what I’ve heard over the years from grandparents and others who endured them. Now, well over a decade after Liz and I left the rat race for a more self-reliant lifestyle, I’m able to clearly see the rules that will allow us to thrive in GOOD times or in BAD times. I’ve distilled this list down to 10 Survival Lessons from the Great Depression. And here’s a shock if you’re a prepper…guns and ammo aren’t on the list. Regardless of whether good times or very bad economic times lie ahead, you’ll get through just fine if you follow these 10 rules NOW as well as later. Okay, here we go. 1. Be Frugal – During the Great Depression (and prior), being frugal was considered a virtue…something to be proud of. Imagine that! Now, compare that with the connotation frequently assigned today, when it is suggested by many that one is stingy or cheap. That’s a ridiculous definition and is the result of living in a society where marketers admonish consumers to spend ever more money in an effort to keep up with the (perpetually out of reach) Jones’s. The path to freedom and wealth is to make the most of what you have and live below your means. If you have children, show them now how to do the same. Practice budgeting yourself, teach them to do the same and lead by example. 2. Many people believe that The Great Depression was a hard time for all Americans, but is that true? This week, I’ll tackle that myth and share 10 Survival Lessons from The Great Depression era. - Listen to the Podcast
Listen to the Podcast


Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn


So, we all grew up reading and hearing about The Great Depression, right? That time in American history when times were tough, everyone was thrown out of work, food was scarce.
On top of that we had the Dust Bowl with infertile land and tremendous storms of dust blanketing the heartland of the country. And, of course, virtually no one had money. Sounds like a made-for-TV nightmare that’s almost beyond belief.
But—as terrible as that time was, was it really terrible for everyone? I ask, because sometimes the impact of events is often exaggerated when recalled, whether it be a personal or societal event.
And, even if it is horrific, what percentage of the population is it horrific for?
Just a few years ago, from 2007-2009, we had what we’re now calling the Great Recession. That’s when the 8 trillion dollar housing bubble burst.
It led to a big reduction in jobs and consumer spending but, to be honest, I didn’t have much of an impact on my family. We were farming at the time, selling pasture based meats direct to consumers who still were hungry and could afford to eat.
And, the truth is, while many people lost paper money during those years, the unemployment rate peaked at under 11%, meaning that over 88% of people could find jobs.
It’s true that perhaps maybe not the jobs they wanted, and it may also be true that the real unemployment rate was considerably higher, when you factor in people who gave up looking.
But the point I’m making is that it’s often a common misconception that times are harder than they actually were.
I found that to be the case for The Great Depression when I listened to the audiobook, Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression.
In it, author Mildred Armstrong Kalish recounts her childhood fondly as she retells many stories of what it was like to live through hard times.  Funny thing though; like many who lived pretty self-sufficient lifestyles, she wasn’t aware that there were hard times.
Of course now, those who lived in the cities and depended on paychecks fared far worse than Mildred’s family.
And, while a small number of people remained wealthy, being able to provide for oneself made the family much better off since stocks and bonds became worth far less and money was very tight.
As a modern homesteader, I’ve thought a lot about those times and what I’ve heard over the years from grandparents and others who endured them.
Now, well over a decade after clean
Why “Can I Make Money Homesteading?” is the Wrong Question | Homesteading | Farminghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-25-can-make-money-homesteading-wrong-question-homesteading-farming-podcast/ Fri, 24 Feb 2017 07:57:41 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2634 A lot of folks have asked me if they can make money farming or homesteading, but is that even the right question to ask? This week, Liz and I will share why it may not be and what we’ve learned about the financial side of a self-sufficient lifestyle. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn   Welcome to Episode 25! So, we can't count the number of times someone has asked us over the years, "can you make money farming or homesteading?" Usually the question is more revealing than any answer I could provide, for it fails to consider one of the most obvious benefits of homesteading: saving money. Because, the truth is that homesteaders have far more opportunities to eliminate or reduce expenses than most people do. In this episode we list dozens of ways we found to save money WHILE enjoying a more fulfilling, free lifestyle. Some of the areas we cover include: the importance of house size the value of buying cheap (infertile) land and restoring it unnecessary expenses you can do without ways homesteaders and preppers reduce food costs alcohol, gifts and other things you can make yourself what and how to barter to build your homestead the importance of paying for quality how your need for vacation and entertainment changes once you move to the country So, if you're looking for ways to tips and inspiration to become more self-sufficient, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Get the Free eBook: The Self-Sufficient Road Map Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix A lot of folks have asked me if they can make money farming or homesteading, but is that even the right question to ask? This week, Liz and I will share why it may not be and what we’ve learned about the financial side of a self-sufficient lifestyle. From smallfarmnation.com A lot of folks have asked me if they can make money farming or homesteading, but is that even the right question to ask? This week, Liz and I will share why it may not be and what we’ve learned about the financial side of a self-sufficient lifestyle.<br /> <br /> Welcome to Episode 25! So, we can't count the number of times someone has asked us over the years, "can you make money farming or homesteading?"<br /> <br /> Usually the question is more revealing than any answer I could provide, for it fails to consider one of the most obvious benefits of homesteading: saving money. Because, the truth is that homesteaders have far more opportunities to eliminate or reduce expenses than most people do.<br /> <br /> In this episode we list dozens of ways we found to save money WHILE enjoying a more fulfilling, free lifestyle. Some of the areas we cover include:<br /> <br /> the importance of house size<br /> the value of buying cheap (infertile) land and restoring it<br /> unnecessary expenses you can do without<br /> ways homesteaders and preppers reduce food costs<br /> alcohol, gifts and other things you can make yourself<br /> what and how to barter to build your homestead<br /> the importance of paying for quality<br /> how your need for vacation and entertainment changes once you move to the country<br /> So, if you're looking for ways to tips and inspiration to become more self-sufficient, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 51:58 What is Modern Homesteading Anyway? | Homesteading | Preppinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-24-modern-homesteading-anyway-homesteading-prepping-podcast/ Fri, 17 Feb 2017 07:56:16 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2631 Myself and many others on this podcast use the phrase modern homesteading, but what does that really mean in this digital age? Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn   Welcome to Episode 24! So, here's a question for you: What do you visualize when you hear the phrase homesteading, self-sufficient or self-reliance? I’m willing to bet that many of you visualize a natural setting. Perhaps a loving family working hard together. Something between Little House on the Prairie and The Waltons, for those of you old enough to know those television shows. We often picture a family living off the land, tending to crops and animals while being…well…self-sufficient. But...this ain't the 1800s. This is the digital age. In this episode I'll define what modern homesteading really is, and dispel some myths surrounding the notion of homesteading. I also share why I walked away from big-time corporate America, trading in the boardroom for the barnyard. And I share several tips on how to start homesteading and becoming more self-reliant, even if you're cramped in an urban apartment. Things you can do right now to start down your path to self-sufficiency. So, if you're looking for ways to tips and inspiration to become more self-sufficient, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young No Risk Ranching by Greg Judy New Farmers USDA Grants List of all USDA Grant Winners in 2016 SARE Grants ATTRA Grants Calendar Get the Free eBook: The Self-Sufficient Road Map Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Myself and many others on this podcast use the phrase modern homesteading, but what does that really mean in this digital age? - Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn -   From smallfarmnation.com Myself and many others on this podcast use the phrase modern homesteading, but what does that really mean in this digital age?<br /> Welcome to Episode 24! So, here's a question for you: What do you visualize when you hear the phrase homesteading, self-sufficient or self-reliance?<br /> <br /> I’m willing to bet that many of you visualize a natural setting.<br /> <br /> Perhaps a loving family working hard together.<br /> <br /> Listen to The Accidental Farmers on Audible.<br /> Something between Little House on the Prairie and The Waltons, for those of you old enough to know those television shows.<br /> <br /> We often picture a family living off the land, tending to crops and animals while being…well…self-sufficient.<br /> <br /> But...this ain't the 1800s. This is the digital age.<br /> <br /> In this episode I'll define what modern homesteading really is, and dispel some myths surrounding the notion of homesteading.<br /> <br /> I also share why I walked away from big-time corporate America, trading in the boardroom for the barnyard.<br /> <br /> And I share several tips on how to start homesteading and becoming more self-reliant, even if you're cramped in an urban apartment. Things you can do right now to start down your path to self-sufficiency.<br /> <br /> So, if you're looking for ways to tips and inspiration to become more self-sufficient, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 26:39 The Homeschooling Decision| Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-23-homeschooling-decision-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 10 Feb 2017 07:39:14 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2628 Many modern homesteaders made a choice to opt-out and provide for themselves, but what impact does that choice have on their children? This week, we’ll begin a series of discussing the real life ups and downs of homeschooling children. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn   Welcome to Episode 23! This week, Liz and I discuss how we arrived at the difficult choice of homeschooling our daughter. Now, since we've embraced modern homesteading, it's natural that people would assume that we would homeschool. But Liz has a Masters in Special Education and is a former public school teacher. Homeschooling her own child is something she would have never embraced...in our old life. Back before we "opted out" of the rat race. In this episode we share intimate details about: what led us to decide that homeschooling was right for our daughter and our family the unschooling process that Liz has had to go through as a former teacher the fears and worries we had before deciding to homeschool, and how we overcame them how we set-up our permanent homeschool room (see this post for pictures of our set-up) the various curriculum options we examined (Montessori, blending multiple styles - Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, unschooling, thematic unit study, etc.) and how we chose what was right for us We also dive into the benefits and downsides of homeschooling, and what we've learned in our first year on the job. And, of course we talk about the "S" word, or the concern newbies have about "socialization" of homeschool children. We'll continue this discussion quarterly or thereabouts to track our progress. For now, if you're curious about the decision to homeschool, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Get the Free eBook: The Self-Sufficient Road Map Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Many modern homesteaders made a choice to opt-out and provide for themselves, but what impact does that choice have on their children? This week, we’ll begin a series of discussing the real life ups and downs of homeschooling children. - From smallfarmnation.com Many modern homesteaders made a choice to opt-out and provide for themselves, but what impact does that choice have on their children? This week, we’ll begin a series of discussing the real life ups and downs of homeschooling children.<br /> Welcome to Episode 23! This week, Liz and I discuss how we arrived at the difficult choice of homeschooling our daughter.<br /> <br /> Now, since we've embraced modern homesteading, it's natural that people would assume that we would homeschool.<br /> <br /> But Liz has a Masters in Special Education and is a former public school teacher. Homeschooling her own child is something she would have never embraced...in our old life. Back before we "opted out" of the rat race.<br /> <br /> In this episode we share intimate details about:<br /> <br /> what led us to decide that homeschooling was right for our daughter and our family<br /> the unschooling process that Liz has had to go through as a former teacher<br /> the fears and worries we had before deciding to homeschool, and how we overcame them<br /> how we set-up our permanent homeschool room (see this post for pictures of our set-up)<br /> the various curriculum options we examined (Montessori, blending multiple styles - Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, unschooling, thematic unit study, etc.) and how we chose what was right for us<br /> We also dive into the benefits and downsides of homeschooling, and what we've learned in our first year on the job.<br /> <br /> And, of course we talk about the "S" word, or the concern newbies have about "socialization" of homeschool children.<br /> <br /> We'll continue this discussion quarterly or thereabouts to track our progress. For now, if you're curious about the decision to homeschool, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:03:07 How to Start a Farm or Homestead With No Money | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-22-start-farm-homestead-no-money-homesteading-podcast/ Thu, 02 Feb 2017 07:37:31 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2626 I’ve shared many stories of people who have opted out of the rat race, but some of them had saved money to do so? But what if you haven’t? Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn   Welcome to Episode 22! Today, I’ll deal with a caller’s frustration on how to start a homestead or farm with no money. So, I got this call in from a listener a while back and haven’t had a chance to center an episode around it yet. In the call, you can really hear his pain and heartfelt desire to live freely in the country. But, while he has really enjoyed the stories I've shared of others who have "opted out," his perception is that they (and I) made enough money in the corporate world to afford to do so. What he wants to know is how can people with no money afford to live freely in the country. It's a struggle I hear all the time, and today I provide as much help and as many ideas as I can, including the six macro categorical options, at least as I see them. Have savings Inherit land or money Pay as you go Borrow money Raise money Get someone to give you money I dive deep into the ways to get money, from conventional bank and USDA loans to crowdfunding, venture capital, government grants and more. If you're looking for ways to find money so you can start your farm or homestead, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair!   Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young No Risk Ranching by Greg Judy New Farmers USDA Grants List of all USDA Grant Winners in 2016 SARE Grants ATTRA Grants Calendar Get the Free eBook: The Self-Sufficient Road Map Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix I’ve shared many stories of people who have opted out of the rat race, but some of them had saved money to do so? But what if you haven’t? - Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, From smallfarmnation.com I’ve shared many stories of people who have opted out of the rat race, but some of them had saved money to do so? But what if you haven’t?<br /> <br /> Welcome to Episode 22! Today, I’ll deal with a caller’s frustration on how to start a homestead or farm with no money.<br /> <br /> So, I got this call in from a listener a while back and haven’t had a chance to center an episode around it yet. In the call, you can really hear his pain and heartfelt desire to live freely in the country.<br /> <br /> But, while he has really enjoyed the stories I've shared of others who have "opted out," his perception is that they (and I) made enough money in the corporate world to afford to do so.<br /> <br /> What he wants to know is how can people with no money afford to live freely in the country.<br /> <br /> It's a struggle I hear all the time, and today I provide as much help and as many ideas as I can, including the six macro categorical options, at least as I see them.<br /> <br /> Have savings<br /> Inherit land or money<br /> Pay as you go<br /> Borrow money<br /> Raise money<br /> Get someone to give you money<br /> I dive deep into the ways to get money, from conventional bank and USDA loans to crowdfunding, venture capital, government grants and more.<br /> <br /> If you're looking for ways to find money so you can start your farm or homestead, you won't want to miss this. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 28:54 How to Make Money Homesteading | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-20-make-money-homesteading-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 20 Jan 2017 07:31:42 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2624 Moving to the country means you still make money, so how do you decide what business ideas to pursue? Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn   Welcome to Episode 20! This week Liz and I address a caller’s question about how to research and decide the best way to make money homesteading. Listen in as we discuss the many ways to make money farming or with modern homesteading: First, find your PASSION Why exactly do you want to homestead or farm? What excites you and what do you want to do? Do you long to grow the best tomatoes and sell directly to leading chefs? Do you simply want to feed your family? Do you want to be the next Joel Salatin and have a farm of chicken tractors, eggmobiles and salad bar beef? Do you want to live freely in the country but still make a lot of money? Three Revenue Categories to Profitable Homesteading How to Make money homesteading using your land Large livestock -raising cows, selling calves or animals (registered or not). After all, we bought our pigs and Dexters from somewhere :-) Small livestock - chickens, rabbits, etc. (heritage/rare breeds) Farm Stays, events, wedding, private parties Boarding animals How to Make money homesteading with your skills Locally or Physical Teaching classes (preparedness, permaculture, edible landscapes, medicinal herbs, etc.) (we’ve taught classes on cheese, butchering, etc.) Organize and market classes and events on topics you can’t teach (we’ve marketed many classes we couldn’t teach) wilderness survival foraging butchering classes Start a business helping farmers Guided fishing or hunting service Woodcraft business (Patrice Lewis) Online or Virtual Monetized Blogging (Jill Winger, Lisa Steele, Daisy Luther and others) Monetized Podcasting (EO Fire, etc.) Copywriting or editing Authoring (Mark Goodwin and others) Illustrating for authors, web designers, etc. Become a virtual assistant Web or graphic design Voice overs Make money homesteading selling products from your land Farmstead meats (grassfed beef, pastured poultry/pork, etc.) artisan meats (charcuterie) Raw milk Farmstead or artisanal cheese Eggs Become a grower (vegetables, cut flowers, pick your own, transplants, etc.) Artisan soap (Little Seed Farm) It was a insightful discussion and I hope you enjoy it and find that it gives you a lot to think about as you prepare for your self-sufficient life. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Self-Sufficient Life Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Moving to the country means you still make money, so how do you decide what business ideas to pursue? - Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn -   - From smallfarmnation.com Moving to the country means you still make money, so how do you decide what business ideas to pursue?<br /> Welcome to Episode 20! This week Liz and I address a caller’s question about how to research and decide the best way to make money homesteading.<br /> <br /> Listen in as we discuss the many ways to make money farming or with modern homesteading:<br /> <br /> First, find your PASSION<br /> <br /> Why exactly do you want to homestead or farm?<br /> What excites you and what do you want to do?<br /> Do you long to grow the best tomatoes and sell directly to leading chefs?<br /> Do you simply want to feed your family?<br /> Do you want to be the next Joel Salatin and have a farm of chicken tractors, eggmobiles and salad bar beef?<br /> Do you want to live freely in the country but still make a lot of money?<br /> Three Revenue Categories to Profitable Homesteading<br /> <br /> How to Make money homesteading using your land<br /> Large livestock -raising cows, selling calves or animals (registered or not). After all, we bought our pigs and Dexters from somewhere :-)<br /> Small livestock - chickens, rabbits, etc. (heritage/rare breeds)<br /> Farm Stays, events, wedding, private parties<br /> Boarding animals<br /> How to Make money homesteading with your skills<br /> Locally or Physical <br /> Teaching classes (preparedness, permaculture, edible landscapes, medicinal herbs, etc.) (we’ve taught classes on cheese, butchering, etc.)<br /> Organize and market classes and events on topics you can’t teach (we’ve marketed many classes we couldn’t teach)<br /> wilderness survival<br /> foraging<br /> butchering classes<br /> Start a business helping farmers<br /> Guided fishing or hunting service<br /> Woodcraft business (Patrice Lewis)<br /> Online or Virtual<br /> Monetized Blogging (Jill Winger, Lisa Steele, Daisy Luther and others)<br /> Monetized Podcasting (EO Fire, etc.)<br /> Copywriting or editing<br /> Authoring (Mark Goodwin and others)<br /> Illustrating for authors, web designers, etc.<br /> Become a virtual assistant<br /> Web or graphic design<br /> Voice overs<br /> Make money homesteading selling products from your land<br /> Farmstead meats (grassfed beef, pastured poultry/pork, etc.)<br /> artisan meats (charcuterie)<br /> Raw milk<br /> Farmstead or artisanal cheese<br /> Eggs<br /> Become a grower (vegetables, cut flowers, pick your own, transplants, etc.)<br /> Artisan soap (Little Seed Farm)<br /> It was a insightful discussion and I hope you enjoy it and find that it gives you a lot to think about as you prepare for your self-sufficient life.<br /> <br /> So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 57:13 Building a New Homestead with Tim & Liz Young|Farming | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-19-building-new-homestead-tim-liz-youngfarming-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 13 Jan 2017 07:27:09 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2622 smallfarmnation.com<br /> Moving to a new homestead you get to start with a clean slate. So how do you decide what you need? This week, Liz and I share what animals and infrastructure we settled on for our new homestead.<br /> Listen in as we discuss our animal and food choices:<br /> <br /> What breed of pigs we settled on, and why<br /> Cows, both dual purpose and specific breeds for beef and milk<br /> Meat chickens<br /> Hens<br /> German Shepherds versus Anatolian or Great Pyrenees<br /> Top bar hives and bees<br /> Garden area requirements<br /> We also cover all the infrastructure and building we've done in the past year, including:<br /> <br /> Raised bed Hugelkultur garden (click here for pics)<br /> Building a tall fence to keep deer out of the orchard/garden<br /> Integrating a play area into the garden space (click here for pics)<br /> Creating a medicinal herb garden<br /> Adding a metal building workshop<br /> Milling lumber and building a barn with hay feeder (click here for pics)<br /> Building deer blinds<br /> Building a dual dog house with center "warm" area<br /> Building shelves (so many shelves!) for pantry, craft area and homeschool room<br /> Building a homeschool room with bookcases, tables, etc<br /> And building a woodland trail and survival practice area (click here for pics)<br /> It was a fun discussion and I hope you enjoy it and find that it gives you a lot to think about as you prepare for your self-sufficient life. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:05:25 Esther Emery & The Circle of Life|Off-Grid | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-18-esther-emery-circle-lifeoff-grid-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 06 Jan 2017 07:25:20 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2620 Welcome to Episode 18!  So, if you’re the daughter of a famous homesteader, you’re destined to live off the land yourself, right? Today, you’ll find out what falls from the sky when a teenager rebels against the mother of modern homesteading. Listen Now! Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn So, imagine your mother wrote the book on Country Living. I mean—literally. In addition to bearing seven children in the 70s, Carla Emery also found time to write The Encyclopedia of Country Living. That’s the first book that many wannabe homesteaders place on their mantles. It’s a million word tome that’s on my bookshelf, and I’ve thumbed the pages of my copy until they’ve frayed. But this isn't a story about Carla. It's the story of Esther Emery, Carla's youngest daughter. Carla was 30 when her first child was born in 1970, 40 by the time Esther, her seventh, arrived. In a “back-to-the-land” era when it seemed everyone wanted to know how to make it in the country,The Encyclopedia of Country Living began selling like hotcakes. But Esther grew up on the latter side of that trend, as the go-go 80s and 90s saw Silicon Valley capitalistic values render the idea of homesteading as quaint and archaic. When tragedy struck Carla's family and resulted in her losing her homestead, Carla, the mother of modern homesteading, was forced to move to the city to homeschool her children. As a result, Esther knew nothing of the life of open spaces and farm chores that her mother wrote about, and took a long and winding path through life to where she is today. That path included battling bulimia, enrolling in a far away college at the age of 15, a career in theater in southern California and even a full year of self-imposed exile from the Internet, a story she chronicled in her new book, What Falls From the Sky. After that year of exile she and her husband, Nick, felt a calling to return to their Idaho roots, where they have lived off-grid in a yurt for three years while Nick builds their cabin from timber he milled himself. Now that Esther is baking bread in a wood stove, doing laundry with the help of a bicycle and fighting off bears, she is finding that the circle of life is becoming complete. She is becoming like the mother she rebelled against as the land has summoned her home. It's a great story of renewal and redemption that you won't want to miss. Grab your coffee and listen in. Subscribe Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode of Self-Sufficient Life: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it!   Resources Relevant to This Episode Esther Emery's Site What Falls From the Sky by Esther Emery How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod & Audionautix Welcome to Episode 18!  So, if you’re the daughter of a famous homesteader, you’re destined to live off the land yourself, right? Today, you’ll find out what falls from the sky when a teenager rebels against the mother of modern homesteading. smallfarmnation.com <br /> Welcome to Episode 18!  So, if you’re the daughter of a famous homesteader, you’re destined to live off the land yourself, right? Today, you’ll find out what falls from the sky when a teenager rebels against the mother of modern homesteading.<br /> <br /> So, imagine your mother wrote the book on Country Living.<br /> <br /> I mean—literally.<br /> <br /> In addition to bearing seven children in the 70s, Carla Emery also found time to write The Encyclopedia of Country Living.<br /> <br /> That’s the first book that many wannabe homesteaders place on their mantles.<br /> <br /> It’s a million word tome that’s on my bookshelf, and I’ve thumbed the pages of my copy until they’ve frayed.<br /> <br /> But this isn't a story about Carla. It's the story of Esther Emery, Carla's youngest daughter.<br /> <br /> Carla was 30 when her first child was born in 1970, 40 by the time Esther, her seventh, arrived.<br /> <br /> In a “back-to-the-land” era when it seemed everyone wanted to know how to make it in the country,The Encyclopedia of Country Living began selling like hotcakes.<br /> <br /> But Esther grew up on the latter side of that trend, as the go-go 80s and 90s saw Silicon Valley capitalistic values render the idea of homesteading as quaint and archaic.<br /> <br /> When tragedy struck Carla's family and resulted in her losing her homestead, Carla, the mother of modern homesteading, was forced to move to the city to homeschool her children.<br /> <br /> As a result, Esther knew nothing of the life of open spaces and farm chores that her mother wrote about, and took a long and winding path through life to where she is today.<br /> <br /> That path included battling bulimia, enrolling in a far away college at the age of 15, a career in theater in southern California and even a full year of self-imposed exile from the Internet, a story she chronicled in her new book, What Falls From the Sky.<br /> <br /> After that year of exile she and her husband, Nick, felt a calling to return to their Idaho roots, where they have lived off-grid in a yurt for three years while Nick builds their cabin from timber he milled himself.<br /> <br /> Now that Esther is baking bread in a wood stove, doing laundry with the help of a bicycle and fighting off bears, she is finding that the circle of life is becoming complete. She is becoming like the mother she rebelled against as the land has summoned her home.<br /> <br /> It's a great story of renewal and redemption that you won't want to miss. Grab your coffee and listen in. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 53:20 Homestead Privacy with Tim & Liz Young|Farming | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-17-homestead-privacy-tim-liz-youngfarming-homesteading-podcast/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 07:21:19 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2618 How can a modern homesteader expect to achieve personal privacy in the digital age? This week, Liz and I discuss the homestead we settled on and the steps we have taken to live a private, self-sufficient life. Listen to the Podcast Subscribe to Self-Sufficient Life on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play or TuneIn Welcome to Episode 17! This week Liz and I tell describe the homestead property we settled on, and share what concessions we had to make since there is no "perfect" property. Here's what we discuss about the property: How much acreage we settled on Woods vs pasture/open land House size/configuration Well vs gravity water Streams/water features Southern exposure Fruit trees Garden space and outbuildings To heat or not to heat with wood Proximity to populated areas Homeschooling/homesteading culture We also discuss our overall objectives for homesteading. Those include: Living as freely as possible maximize free time having a property that requires low maintenance time to develop skills we're interested in, such as foraging, medicinal herbs and bushcrafting maximize time together as a family able to travel if desired Be as independent and sustainable as possible grow our own vegetables and most of our fruit grow and butcher or hunt for our own meat produce dairy and eggs Teach our daughter about animal husbandry and...you know...the birds and the bees Provide pollination and collect honey and wax from bees Use our land's materials for building projects Grow, harvest and produce as much of our own medicine as possible Beyond that, we had an overarching goal that we began discussing in Episode 16. That is, to achieve and maintain a high level of personal privacy. That's a hard thing to do in this digital age. But when a listener called in and asked about privacy, we decided to share our approach on achieving privacy in this episode. Here's what we discussed: Why privacy is important to us bad guy takes license plate number (road rage, etc.) That privacy is about keeping our private life private. It’s not about avoiding taxes or even asset protection, although it helps with the latter. The importance of separating your name from physical residence driver's license managing FedEx, etc., deliveries home ownership titling deposits for utilities, DirecTV, etc. Setting up PO boxes BEFORE moving. That way you can complete the USPS forms truthfully with your two forms of ID. Providing no forwarding address Setting-up bank account before moving or keeping existing bank account Using passport for ID instead of Driver’s License. DL very seldom actually required. Using cash over credit Dealing with family who wants to know why they can't tell people where you live What is a lie (intent to both deceive and cause harm) It was a spirited and interesting discussion, and I hope you enjoy it and find that it gives you a lot to think about as you prepare for your self-sufficient life. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix How can a modern homesteader expect to achieve personal privacy in the digital age? This week, Liz and I discuss the homestead we settled on and the steps we have taken to live a private, self-sufficient life. - Listen to the Podcast smallfarmnation.com <br /> How can a modern homesteader expect to achieve personal privacy in the digital age? This week, Liz and I discuss the homestead we settled on and the steps we have taken to live a private, self-sufficient life.<br /> Welcome to Episode 17! This week Liz and I tell describe the homestead property we settled on, and share what concessions we had to make since there is no "perfect" property.<br /> <br /> Here's what we discuss about the property:<br /> <br /> How much acreage we settled on<br /> Woods vs pasture/open land<br /> House size/configuration<br /> Well vs gravity water<br /> Streams/water features<br /> Southern exposure<br /> Fruit trees<br /> Garden space and outbuildings<br /> To heat or not to heat with wood<br /> Proximity to populated areas<br /> Homeschooling/homesteading culture<br /> We also discuss our overall objectives for homesteading. Those include:<br /> <br /> Living as freely as possible<br /> maximize free time<br /> having a property that requires low maintenance<br /> time to develop skills we're interested in, such as foraging, medicinal herbs and bushcrafting<br /> maximize time together as a family<br /> able to travel if desired<br /> Be as independent and sustainable as possible<br /> grow our own vegetables and most of our fruit<br /> grow and butcher or hunt for our own meat<br /> produce dairy and eggs<br /> Teach our daughter about animal husbandry and...you know...the birds and the bees<br /> Provide pollination and collect honey and wax from bees<br /> Use our land's materials for building projects<br /> Grow, harvest and produce as much of our own medicine as possible<br /> Beyond that, we had an overarching goal that we began discussing in Episode 16. That is, to achieve and maintain a high level of personal privacy.<br /> <br /> That's a hard thing to do in this digital age. But when a listener called in and asked about privacy, we decided to share our approach on achieving privacy in this episode.<br /> <br /> Here's what we discussed:<br /> <br /> Why privacy is important to us<br /> bad guy takes license plate number (road rage, etc.)<br /> That privacy is about keeping our private life private. It’s not about avoiding taxes or even asset protection, although it helps with the latter.<br /> The importance of separating your name from physical residence<br /> driver's license<br /> managing FedEx, etc., deliveries<br /> home ownership titling<br /> deposits for utilities, DirecTV, etc.<br /> Setting up PO boxes BEFORE moving. That way you can complete the USPS forms truthfully with your two forms of ID.<br /> Providing no forwarding address<br /> Setting-up bank account before moving or keeping existing bank account<br /> Using passport for ID instead of Driver’s License. DL very seldom actually required.<br /> Using cash over credit<br /> Dealing with family who wants to know why they can't tell people where you live<br /> What is a lie (intent to both deceive and cause harm)<br /> It was a spirited and interesting discussion, and I hope you enjoy it and find that it gives you a lot to think about as you prepare for your self-sufficient life. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair!<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:03:39 Moving to a New Homestead with Tim & Liz Young |Farming | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-16-moving-new-homestead-tim-liz-youngfarming-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 16 Dec 2016 07:19:27 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2616 If you had an opportunity to opt out of the rat race and set up a modern homestead, how would you go about it? This week you’ll hear my wife Liz and I share our step-by-step process for choosing our new homestead location. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 16! This week’s episode is a little different in that it doesn’t profile another homesteader or farmer. Instead, it begins the process of profiling us. By that I mean my wife, Liz, and myself, and the life of modern homesteading that we’re enjoying. Now, many of you have followed our journey since we left the rat race, back in 2006. You read the farm blog we maintained years ago. And bout a quarter million of you listened to our podcasts from 2010-2012, many from all corners of the world. And tens of thousands more have read my books, most notably The Accidental Farmers and How to Make Money Homesteading. Still, many of you are unacquainted with our story. In a nutshell, we lived in suburban Atlanta in 2006, on a golf course with a strict HOA. We’d never farmed, but that didn’t stop us from buying over 120 acres in rural Georgia, leaving behind our careers in corporate America and teaching to become first-generation farmers. We raised pretty much anything that walks. Grassfed beef, meat chickens, laying hens, rabbits, pigs, geese, ducks, dairy cows and, just for fun, donkeys, guineas and guardian dogs. We built a great customer base from Atlanta to Athens, GA, and loved hosting farm tours for up to 100 people a month. And then—we sort of went into seclusion in late 2012. We stopped blogging and podcasting, though we continued farming through 2015, selling grassfed meats and farmstead cheese. But in 2015 we stopped farming commercially and began the process of migrating from being farmers to being homesteaders. This is a story of what to look for in a modern homestead property. Liz and I spent a couple of years searching for a new homestead property, as we transitioned from being commercial farmers (for others) to homesteaders. Of course, the process took longer than we wanted, as we had to sell off farm animals and a farm business. We discuss how we handled that in this episode, as well as the reasons that drove us from farming to homesteading. Once we completed those tasks, we still had to find a new homestead. We wanted this to be a very long-term move, if not for life, so we established a series of criteria in looking for a new homestead. Those criteria included: 1) macro criteria for new property incurring no debt / strict budget proximity to family slightly cooler garden zone southern exposure higher elevation rainfall low taxes low/no restrictions on building codes state friendly to homeschool 2) micro criteria for new property mature fruit trees at least 20 acres, unless on a mountain good well water or gravity water/water on property (pond, mountain stream, springs) no sight of paved road no sight of neighbors good hunting/foraging much smaller house ideally heated with wood pasture, but no more than a few acres within an hour of sizable town, 30 mins of grocery store/hospital around like minded-people (homeschool groups, homesteading culture, farming, etc.) 3) things we knew weren’t critical school system fencing high quality pasture outbuildings existing garden (because we’d be putting in raised beds) cosmetics on house…just well insulated and sound Liz and I discuss all these criteria in detail as well as the life of farming versus homesteading. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Small Farm Nation Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the... If you had an opportunity to opt out of the rat race and set up a modern homestead, how would you go about it? This week you’ll hear my wife Liz and I share our step-by-step process for choosing our new homestead location. Listen to the Podcast smallfarmnation.com <br /> This week’s episode is a little different in that it doesn’t profile another homesteader or farmer. Instead, it begins the process of profiling us. By that I mean my wife, Liz, and myself, and the life of modern homesteading that we’re enjoying.<br /> <br /> Now, many of you have followed our journey since we left the rat race, back in 2006.<br /> <br /> You read the farm blog we maintained years ago. And bout a quarter million of you listened to our podcasts from 2010-2012, many from all corners of the world. And tens of thousands more have read my books, most notably The Accidental Farmers and How to Make Money Homesteading.<br /> <br /> Still, many of you are unacquainted with our story.<br /> <br /> In a nutshell, we lived in suburban Atlanta in 2006, on a golf course with a strict HOA. We’d never farmed, but that didn’t stop us from buying over 120 acres in rural Georgia, leaving behind our careers in corporate America and teaching to become first-generation farmers.<br /> <br /> We raised pretty much anything that walks. Grassfed beef, meat chickens, laying hens, rabbits, pigs, geese, ducks, dairy cows and, just for fun, donkeys, guineas and guardian dogs. We built a great customer base from Atlanta to Athens, GA, and loved hosting farm tours for up to 100 people a month.<br /> <br /> And then—we sort of went into seclusion in late 2012. We stopped blogging and podcasting, though we continued farming through 2015, selling grassfed meats and farmstead cheese.<br /> <br /> But in 2015 we stopped farming commercially and began the process of migrating from being farmers to being homesteaders.<br /> <br /> This is a story of what to look for in a modern homestead property.<br /> <br /> Liz and I spent a couple of years searching for a new homestead property, as we transitioned from being commercial farmers (for others) to homesteaders.<br /> <br /> Of course, the process took longer than we wanted, as we had to sell off farm animals and a farm business. We discuss how we handled that in this episode, as well as the reasons that drove us from farming to homesteading.<br /> <br /> Once we completed those tasks, we still had to find a new homestead. We wanted this to be a very long-term move, if not for life, so we established a series of criteria in looking for a new homestead.<br /> <br /> Those criteria included:<br /> <br /> 1) macro criteria for new property<br /> <br /> incurring no debt / strict budget<br /> proximity to family<br /> slightly cooler garden zone<br /> southern exposure<br /> higher elevation<br /> rainfall<br /> low taxes<br /> low/no restrictions on building codes<br /> state friendly to homeschool<br /> 2) micro criteria for new property<br /> <br /> mature fruit trees<br /> at least 20 acres, unless on a mountain<br /> good well water or gravity water/water on property (pond, mountain stream, springs)<br /> no sight of paved road<br /> no sight of neighbors<br /> good hunting/foraging<br /> much smaller house<br /> ideally heated with wood<br /> pasture, but no more than a few acres<br /> within an hour of sizable town, 30 mins of grocery store/hospital<br /> around like minded-people (homeschool groups, homesteading culture, farming, etc.)<br /> 3) things we knew weren’t critical<br /> <br /> school system<br /> fencing<br /> high quality pasture<br /> outbuildings<br /> existing garden (because we’d be putting in raised beds)<br /> cosmetics on house…just well insulated and sound<br /> Liz and I discuss all these criteria in detail as well as the life of farming versus homesteading. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair!<br /> <br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:04:41 The Beginning Farmerhttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-15-beginning-farmer-podcast/ Fri, 09 Dec 2016 07:13:38 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2614 Welcome to Episode 15! So, what can happen when an active youth pastor gets the results from his life insurance physical? Today, you’ll hear how those results and what the doctor ordered drove the youth pastor to become the beginning farmer. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Ethan Book dreamed of being a farmer when he was a kid, but life's necessities steered him in a different direction. After having children, his practical wife insisted he procure life insurance. But that required a physical exam, which revealed Ethan had very high cholesterol. The two options for treatment included a lifetime of medicine, which Ethan wanted to avoid, or a drastic diet change centered on grassfed beef. Ethan opted for the latter approach, but there was a problem. Grass fed beef was expensive, and Ethan didn't earn too much as a youth minister. So, he did the only thing he could do--he bought land, and became a farmer. Today, Ethan blogs at thebeginningfarmer.com, and has an excellent podcast called The Beginning Farmer Show. Listen in to how Ethan and his wife feed their family of seven on less than $150/month at the grocery store, while producing excellent pasture raised pork, beef and lamb for local customers in Iowa. Subscribe Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode of Self-Sufficient Life:     Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Read the Transcript You can read a complete, word-for-word transcript of this episode here. Resources Relevant to This Episode The Beginning Farmer Blog You Can Farm by Joel Salatin How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod & Audionautix Welcome to Episode 15! So, what can happen when an active youth pastor gets the results from his life insurance physical? Today, you’ll hear how those results and what the doctor ordered drove the youth pastor to become the beginning farmer. smallfarmnation.com <br /> Welcome to Episode 15! So, what can happen when an active youth pastor gets the results from his life insurance physical? Today, you’ll hear how those results and what the doctor ordered drove the youth pastor to become the beginning farmer.<br /> <br /> Ethan Book dreamed of being a farmer when he was a kid, but life's necessities steered him in a different direction.<br /> <br /> After having children, his practical wife insisted he procure life insurance. But that required a physical exam, which revealed Ethan had very high cholesterol.<br /> <br /> The two options for treatment included a lifetime of medicine, which Ethan wanted to avoid, or a drastic diet change centered on grassfed beef.<br /> <br /> Ethan opted for the latter approach, but there was a problem. Grass fed beef was expensive, and Ethan didn't earn too much as a youth minister. So, he did the only thing he could do--he bought land, and became a farmer.<br /> <br /> Today, Ethan blogs at thebeginningfarmer.com, and has an excellent podcast called The Beginning Farmer Show.<br /> <br /> Listen in to how Ethan and his wife feed their family of seven on less than $150/month at the grocery store, while producing excellent pasture raised pork, beef and lamb for local customers in Iowa. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 57:34 From Investment Banker & Fashion Designer to Sustainable Farmershttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-14-encore-episode-investment-banker-fashion-designer-sustainable-farmers-podcast/ Fri, 02 Dec 2016 07:09:17 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2612 In this episode you'll hear the story of how an investment banker and a fashion designer traded the glamour of Manhattan for goats and brambles in Tennessee. Imagine being a young couple living the good life in New York. One's an investment banker, the other's a fashion designer and both are on their way to the top. Then, they get this wild idea--"Hey, let's quit our jobs and move to the country to milk cows and make artisan cheese." Only when they find their farm, it's not what they imagined. This is the story of starting an artisan goat soap business. Actually, the dream was to start an artisan farmstead cheese business, but one obstacle led to another and forced James and Eileen Ray down a different path as they struggled to give birth to Little Seed Farm. If you're into modern homesteading, self-reliance, preparedness or self-sufficiency, grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Many people dream of opting out of the rat race, but most don't act on their dreams. James and Eileen did. They walked away from great jobs and incomes, took a leap of faith and now live a life with purpose. A life they want to live. Their journey is an inspiration to anyone wanting a self-sufficient life. Subscribe Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Read the Transcript You can read a complete, word-for-word transcript of this episode here. Resources Relevant to This Episode Little Seed Farm Making Soap From Scratch: How to Make Handmade Soap-A Beginner's Guide How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod & Audionautix In this episode you'll hear the story of how an investment banker and a fashion designer traded the glamour of Manhattan for goats and brambles in Tennessee. - Imagine being a young couple living the good life in New York. smallfarmnation.com <br /> In this episode you'll hear the story of how an investment banker and a fashion designer traded the glamour of Manhattan for goats and brambles in Tennessee.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Imagine being a young couple living the good life in New York. One's an investment banker, the other's a fashion designer and both are on their way to the top. Then, they get this wild idea--"Hey, let's quit our jobs and move to the country to milk cows and make artisan cheese." Only when they find their farm, it's not what they imagined.<br /> <br /> This is the story of starting an artisan goat soap business. Actually, the dream was to start an artisan farmstead cheese business, but one obstacle led to another and forced James and Eileen Ray down a different path as they struggled to give birth to Little Seed Farm.<br /> <br /> If you're into modern homesteading, self-reliance, preparedness or self-sufficiency, grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 55:06 The Accidental Farmers with Tim & Liz Young|Farming | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-13-accidental-farmers-tim-liz-youngfarming-homesteading-podcast/ Tue, 22 Nov 2016 06:59:12 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2610 So, what can happen when a suburban couple living on a golf course decides to take a horseback riding trip? Turns out they decide to chuck the house, buy 100 acres in the country and become the accidental farmers. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 13! This is a story about...well...it's my story. Or more accurately, the story of how my wife, Liz, and I found ourselves out here in the country when we used to be in there (corporate America). Liz was a teacher with a Masters degree. I (Tim) was an entrepreneur, running marketing-type businesses. We were both successful, but not over the top successful. Just...typical suburban people living the typical suburban life. I'd like to say we planned our escape out of the rat race, but we never even contemplated it. We just took a horseback riding trip for Liz's birthday and fell in love with the notion of rural living. Then, after reading books such as The Omnivore's Dilemma and Slaughterhouse, we immediately became aware of and appalled by how food was produced. So, rather than doing something sensible (like just going to a farmers market), we sold our golf course house, bought a run-down piece of land deep in the country and became first-generation farmers. We produced every type of meat--grassfed beef, pastured pork, chicken, turkey, duck, rabbit and geese, and even started a grass-based dairy. From there we began making farmstead and artisan cheese, and loved serving customers in Atlanta and north Georgia. But we continually struggled to find the balance between farm life and homesteading. We openly shared that struggle for years in our blog and podcast, called the Nature's Harmony Farmcast. In this very special episode of Self-Sufficient Life, I share one of our old Farmcasts, recorded six years ago in November 2010. It's appropriate to share now at Thanksgiving, and for you long-time fans and follower, I hope you enjoy this trek down memory lane. Subscribe to the Small Farm Nation Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode:   Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Resources Relevant to This Episode How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix So, what can happen when a suburban couple living on a golf course decides to take a horseback riding trip? Turns out they decide to chuck the house, buy 100 acres in the country and become the accidental farmers. - Listen to the Podcast smallfarmnation.com <br /> So, what can happen when a suburban couple living on a golf course decides to take a horseback riding trip? Turns out they decide to chuck the house, buy 100 acres in the country and become the accidental farmers.<br /> Welcome to Episode 13! This is a story about...well...it's my story. Or more accurately, the story of how my wife, Liz, and I found ourselves out here in the country when we used to be in there (corporate America).<br /> <br /> Liz was a teacher with a Masters degree. I (Tim) was an entrepreneur, running marketing-type businesses. We were both successful, but not over the top successful. Just...typical suburban people living the typical suburban life.<br /> <br /> I'd like to say we planned our escape out of the rat race, but we never even contemplated it. We just took a horseback riding trip for Liz's birthday and fell in love with the notion of rural living. Then, after reading books such as The Omnivore's Dilemma and Slaughterhouse, we immediately became aware of and appalled by how food was produced.<br /> <br /> So, rather than doing something sensible (like just going to a farmers market), we sold our golf course house, bought a run-down piece of land deep in the country and became first-generation farmers.<br /> <br /> We produced every type of meat--grassfed beef, pastured pork, chicken, turkey, duck, rabbit and geese, and even started a grass-based dairy. From there we began making farmstead and artisan cheese, and loved serving customers in Atlanta and north Georgia.<br /> <br /> But we continually struggled to find the balance between farm life and homesteading. We openly shared that struggle for years in our blog and podcast, called the Nature's Harmony Farmcast.<br /> <br /> In this very special episode of Self-Sufficient Life, I share one of our old Farmcasts, recorded six years ago in November 2010. It's appropriate to share now at Thanksgiving, and for you long-time fans and follower, I hope you enjoy this trek down memory lane. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:09:32 Pastured Pork | Farming | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-12-pastured-pork-farming-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 18 Nov 2016 06:57:46 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2608 smallfarmnation.com <br /> So, what happens when a Harvard educated lawyer trades in the bright lights of the city for rural farm life? Well, when he stops bringing home the bacon he learns to actually make award-winning bacon and sausage. That's what!<br /> This week you’ll hear the real-life Green Acres story of how a lawyer learned what it really means to bring home the bacon.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> In the 1960’s fictional television series, Green Acres, Eddie Albert played the character Oliver Douglas. Oliver was a Harvard-educated lawyer who traded city life for a farm in Hooterville, deep in rural America.<br /> <br /> Likewise, James Faison is a Harvard-educated lawyer who, after the death of his grandparents, traded in fancy dinners and big paychecks to restore his grandfather's farm to health.<br /> <br /> But after taking a few farming classes, James the lawyer quickly learned, as he says, that he "couldn't grow a blade of grass!"<br /> <br /> Undeterred, James found a better way to make an impact in the local farming scene. He identified a gap in the market between chefs and retailers who wanted pastured meat products and small, family farmers who struggled with how to market their products.<br /> <br /> James created a business to fill that gap. The business, Milton's Local, was named after his grandfather, and is a distributor for family farmers as well as an award-winning brand of pastured pork products. Their mission is to support sustainable agriculture by creating wholesale channels for family farmers.<br /> <br /> James teaches us that there are many ways to "play" the farming game, and that you don't necessarily have to be a "grower."<br /> <br /> If you're interested in figuring out how to get out of the rat race and earn a self-sufficient income living off the land, grab some coffee and pull up a chair!<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 45:20 Abundant Permaculture with Justin Rhodes| Backyard Chickens | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-11-abundant-permaculture-justin-rhodes-backyard-chickens-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 11 Nov 2016 06:51:15 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2606 Whatta ya get when you combine a drunken homeless man, a deer tick and the Internet? Today, you’ll find out how those three ingredients, along with a determined entrepreneur, add up to Abundant Permaculture. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 11! This is a story about Justin Rhodes. A fellow who didn’t opt out of the rat race, because he never even opted in. Justin has taken a winding journey from western North Carolina to Honduras and even Australia before landing back near Asheville to start his online homesteading business, Abundant Permaculture. Along the way Justin encountered a homeless man who prophesied his homesteading future, faced financial crisis that threw his family onto food stamps and even battled Lyme Disease that forced him to abandon market farming and find other sources of self-sufficient income. But Justin is a determined, resilient man and an outstanding example of modern homesteading. After a successful Kickstarter campaign, Justin launched Abundant Permaculture and a wildly popular YouTube channel and has figured out how to make money homesteading with online courses, blogging, selling homestead videos and via his YouTube channel. If you're interested in figuring out how to get out of the rat race and earn a self-sufficient income living off the land, grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Self-Sufficient Life Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Read the Transcript You can read a complete, word-for-word transcript of this episode here. Resources Relevant to This Episode Abundant Permaculture Permaculture Chickens Film The Four Hour Workweek by Tim Ferris Launch! An Internet Millionaire's Secret Formula To Sell Almost Anything Online, Build A Business You Love, And Live The Life Of Your Dreams by Jeff Walker How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Whatta ya get when you combine a drunken homeless man, a deer tick and the Internet? Today, you’ll find out how those three ingredients, along with a determined entrepreneur, add up to Abundant Permaculture. Listen to the Podcast smallfarmnation.com <br /> Whatta ya get when you combine a drunken homeless man, a deer tick and the Internet? Today, you’ll find out how those three ingredients, along with a determined entrepreneur, add up to Abundant Permaculture.<br /> <br /> This is a story about Justin Rhodes. A fellow who didn’t opt out of the rat race, because he never even opted in.<br /> <br /> Justin has taken a winding journey from western North Carolina to Honduras and even Australia before landing back near Asheville to start his online homesteading business, Abundant Permaculture.<br /> <br /> Along the way Justin encountered a homeless man who prophesied his homesteading future, faced financial crisis that threw his family onto food stamps and even battled Lyme Disease that forced him to abandon market farming and find other sources of self-sufficient income.<br /> <br /> But Justin is a determined, resilient man and an outstanding example of modern homesteading. After a successful Kickstarter campaign, Justin launched Abundant Permaculture and a wildly popular YouTube channel and has figured out how to make money homesteading with online courses, blogging, selling homestead videos and via his YouTube channel.<br /> <br /> If you're interested in figuring out how to get out of the rat race and earn a self-sufficient income living off the land, grab some coffee and pull up a chair!<br /> <br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 54:09 The Hot Dog Who Started a Lavender Farm After His Owner Lost Everything | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-10-hot-dog-started-lavender-farm-owner-lost-everything-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 04 Nov 2016 13:38:35 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2572 Everyone wants to be a millionaire, but where do you turn when you strike it rich then lose it all in a real estate meltdown? In this episode I share the story of a hot dog who rescued a couple of corporate drop-outs who lost everything in the Great Recession. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 10! This is the story of Laurie Charpentier, who accomplished something we all dream of--becoming a millionaire. Then, in the blink of an eye she lost it all, including her house, before a dachshund came into her life and changed everything. After dropping out of high school, Laurie earned her GED, then a college degree and climbed the corporate ladder, first as an accountant and then as director of human resources. Her employee-loving boss appreciated her, so much that he rewarded her with a six-figure income and an annual bonus. But when the boss sold the company, the new buyer had a very different perspective on how to treat employees. Laurie lost her job, but thanks to the stock options she had been rewarded, she had some time to chart a new course. So she became a life coach, only to find out that you actually have to sell to get new clients. Laurie's introverted personality prevented that, so she and her husband, Mark, decided to focus on generating passive income by investing the millions they had made from the company sale. They invested every penny in the real estate market. In 2008. Of course, they lost everything, including the house they lived in. So Laurie got another job in HR. Again, she was valued so much that her new boss doubled her salary within the first six months. And shortly thereafter, with no warning--he fired her. With her life out of control and with no security, Laurie didn't know where to turn. She was dependent on others for income and her identity in life. That's when a little dog named Max entered into her life and changed everything. Max allowed Laurie to think, not of what had gone wrong, but of what was still possible. Laurie and Mark soon found a way to start a small farm. After analyzing other farm enterprises--milking goats, market gardening, etc.--she decided to start a lavender farm in Rhode Island. And Max decided to start an apothecary for dogs. This is really a powerful story that winds through the highs and lows of life, and ends up on a small farm. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Small Farm Nation Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode:     Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Read the Transcript You can read a complete, word-for-word transcript of this episode here. Resources Relevant to This Episode Max's Herb Farm Start Prepping by Tim Young How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Everyone wants to be a millionaire, but where do you turn when you strike it rich then lose it all in a real estate meltdown? In this episode I share the story of a hot dog who rescued a couple of corporate drop-outs who lost everything in the Great Re... smallfarmnation.com <br /> Everyone wants to be a millionaire, but where do you turn when you strike it rich then lose it all in a real estate meltdown? In this episode I share the story of a hot dog who rescued a couple of corporate drop-outs who lost everything in the Great Recession.<br /> <br /> Welcome to Episode 10! This is the story of Laurie Charpentier, who accomplished something we all dream of--becoming a millionaire. Then, in the blink of an eye she lost it all, including her house, before a dachshund came into her life and changed everything.<br /> <br /> After dropping out of high school, Laurie earned her GED, then a college degree and climbed the corporate ladder, first as an accountant and then as director of human resources. Her employee-loving boss appreciated her, so much that he rewarded her with a six-figure income and an annual bonus. But when the boss sold the company, the new buyer had a very different perspective on how to treat employees.<br /> <br /> Laurie lost her job, but thanks to the stock options she had been rewarded, she had some time to chart a new course. So she became a life coach, only to find out that you actually have to sell to get new clients. Laurie's introverted personality prevented that, so she and her husband, Mark, decided to focus on generating passive income by investing the millions they had made from the company sale.<br /> <br /> They invested every penny in the real estate market. In 2008.<br /> <br /> Of course, they lost everything, including the house they lived in.<br /> <br /> So Laurie got another job in HR. Again, she was valued so much that her new boss doubled her salary within the first six months.<br /> <br /> And shortly thereafter, with no warning--he fired her.<br /> <br /> With her life out of control and with no security, Laurie didn't know where to turn. She was dependent on others for income and her identity in life.<br /> <br /> That's when a little dog named Max entered into her life and changed everything. Max allowed Laurie to think, not of what had gone wrong, but of what was still possible.<br /> <br /> Laurie and Mark soon found a way to start a small farm. After analyzing other farm enterprises--milking goats, market gardening, etc.--she decided to start a lavender farm in Rhode Island.<br /> <br /> And Max decided to start an apothecary for dogs.<br /> <br /> This is really a powerful story that winds through the highs and lows of life, and ends up on a small farm. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:02:47 Chris Martenson | Crash Course | Economic Collapse | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-9-chris-martenson-crash-course-economic-collapse-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 28 Oct 2016 13:36:14 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2568 So what would cause a trained scientist and big pharma executive to sell everything he owns and move to the country? Well, find out as I share the story of, not a mad scientist, but a scientist who got mad when he discovered we’re on a Crash Course with economic collapse. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 9! This is the story of Chris Martenson, who isn't your average scientist. Or corporate executive, for that matter. While he was "nature boy" as a child, Chris loved science and data, and continued his formal education until he was almost 30. He wanted to teach at the secondary level, but found himself forced to purse a career in business. His passion for science landed him in "big pharma," where he pulled down big bucks and played the game just the way it was supposed to be played. But when a market "correction" wiped out 40{f08661e966cfbba2afdc219076bf0ce6e15467ec087bdfb769bbeccdbc1c77ea} of his portfolio, the scientist in Chris became mad. So he began to investigate, and found that, not only was the game rigged against him (and you), but that we're on a crash course with collapse in energy, the environment and the economy. So Chris and his wife, Becca, opted-out and changed everything. They sold the waterfront home and big boat and moved to rural Massachusetts to begin homeschooling their children and homesteading to buffer themselves from the hard times ahead. In the midst of that, Chris began sharing his concerns and built a large following for his Crash Course book and videos, and his website, Peak Prosperity. Chris shares his thoughts on the economy, the importance of becoming resilient through self-reliance, the value of gold, silver and precious metals, how to decide where to locate, homeschooling and so much more. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Self-Sufficient Life Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates!   Resources Relevant to This Episode Chris's website - Peak Prosperity The Crash Course Videos on YouTube Chris's book - The Crash Course Chris's book - Prosper Book - Men are From Mars, Women are From Venus Start Prepping by Tim Young How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix So what would cause a trained scientist and big pharma executive to sell everything he owns and move to the country? Well, find out as I share the story of, not a mad scientist, but a scientist who got mad when he discovered we’re on a Crash Course wit...
Listen to the Podcast


SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES



Welcome to Episode 9! This is the story of Chris Martenson, who isn't your average scientist. Or corporate executive, for that matter.

While he was "nature boy" as a child, Chris loved science and data, and continued his formal education until he was almost 30. He wanted to teach at the secondary level, but found himself forced to purse a career in business.

His passion for science landed him in "big pharma," where he pulled down big bucks and played the game just the way it was supposed to be played. But when a market "correction" wiped out 40{f08661e966cfbba2afdc219076bf0ce6e15467ec087bdfb769bbeccdbc1c77ea} of his portfolio, the scientist in Chris became mad. So he began to investigate, and found that, not only was the game rigged against him (and you), but that we're on a crash course with collapse in energy, the environment and the economy.

So Chris and his wife, Becca, opted-out and changed everything. They sold the waterfront home and big boat and moved to rural Massachusetts to begin homeschooling their children and homesteading to buffer themselves from the hard times ahead.

In the midst of that, Chris began sharing his concerns and built a large following for his Crash Course book and videos, and his website, Peak Prosperity.

Chris shares his thoughts on the economy, the importance of becoming resilient through self-reliance, the value of gold, silver and precious metals, how to decide where to locate, homeschooling and so much more. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair!
Subscribe to the Self-Sufficient Life Podcast
Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode:







Thanks for Listening!
Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post.

Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it!

Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates!

 
]]> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean Artisan Cheese | Raising Goats | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-8-artisan-cheese-raising-goats-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 21 Oct 2016 13:27:53 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2566 If you think it’s tough trying to raise a kid, try raising 185 hungry kids. Today, I’ll share the story of a New York lawyer and a high-end builder who decided to ditch their demanding clients so they could herd goats and make artisan cheese. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 8! Kathryn Spann grew up in the farm country of Durham, NC, but she quickly fled to become a high-flying New York lawyer. But things go full circle in life, and when she met a high-end builder, Dave Krabbe, who had as much stress in his work as she did, they decided to opt-out of the rat race. They bought land, fell in love with goats and became farmstead artisan cheese makers at Prodigal Farm. In no time, their goats were giving birth to almost 200 kids a year, meaning Kathryn and Dave had to quickly learn every aspect of sustainable farming. Milking, breeding, marketing, cheese making, pasture management--the skills and chores seem endless, and Kathryn and Dave work more hours for less money than before. But their life is much fuller and more rewarding, and they wouldn't trade it. Kathryn shares her thoughts on cheese making, farming, Kickstarter crowdfunding, goats and much more. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Self-Sufficient Life Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates!   Resources Relevant to This Episode Prodigal Farm How to Start an Artisan Cheese Business - Online Course Start Prepping by Tim Young How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix If you think it’s tough trying to raise a kid, try raising 185 hungry kids. Today, I’ll share the story of a New York lawyer and a high-end builder who decided to ditch their demanding clients so they could herd goats and make artisan cheese. smallfarmnation.com <br /> If you think it’s tough trying to raise a kid, try raising 185 hungry kids. Today, I’ll share the story of a New York lawyer and a high-end builder who decided to ditch their demanding clients so they could herd goats and make artisan cheese.<br /> <br /> Kathryn Spann grew up in the farm country of Durham, NC, but she quickly fled to become a high-flying New York lawyer. But things go full circle in life, and when she met a high-end builder, Dave Krabbe, who had as much stress in his work as she did, they decided to opt-out of the rat race. They bought land, fell in love with goats and became farmstead artisan cheese makers at Prodigal Farm.<br /> <br /> In no time, their goats were giving birth to almost 200 kids a year, meaning Kathryn and Dave had to quickly learn every aspect of sustainable farming. Milking, breeding, marketing, cheese making, pasture management--the skills and chores seem endless, and Kathryn and Dave work more hours for less money than before. But their life is much fuller and more rewarding, and they wouldn't trade it.<br /> <br /> Kathryn shares her thoughts on cheese making, farming, Kickstarter crowdfunding, goats and much more. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair!<br /> <br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 48:44 Daisy Luther | The Organic Prepper | Survival Mom | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-7-daisy-luther-organic-prepper-survival-mom-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 14 Oct 2016 13:25:11 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2563 If you want to change the way people think, sometimes you just gotta get right up in their grill and tell ‘em what you think. Today, I’ll share the story of Daisy Luther. A freedom fighting, gun-toting, homeschooling mother who’s inspiring a nation of Organic Preppers. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 7!  This is the fascinating story of Daisy Luther from the blogs The Organic Prepper and DaisyLuther.com. I think you'll really enjoy the story of the winding path that led Daisy to homesteading and outspoken preparedness. A series of family tragedies, job losses and hardships drove her deep into the wilderness to homeschool her children, and learn that homesteading isn't as easy as it first seems. Her experiences reignited the skeptical, always questioning persona of her youth and inspired her to take up writing. She wrote books and multiple blogs centered on prepping, preparedness and delivering the truth in an unabashed way that you never see in mainstream media. Daisy shares her thoughts on homeschooling, homesteading, online courses, self-sufficient income, prepping, preparedness and much more. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Self-Sufficient Life Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode:     Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week for Self-Sufficient Life. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates!   Resources Relevant to This Episode The Organic Prepper DaisyLuther.com Prepper's University How to Be Invisible by JJ Luna Start Prepping by Tim Young How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix If you want to change the way people think, sometimes you just gotta get right up in their grill and tell ‘em what you think. Today, I’ll share the story of Daisy Luther. A freedom fighting, gun-toting, homeschooling mother who’s inspiring a nation of ... smallfarmnation.com <br /> If you want to change the way people think, sometimes you just gotta get right up in their grill and tell ‘em what you think. Today, I’ll share the story of Daisy Luther. A freedom fighting, gun-toting, homeschooling mother who’s inspiring a nation of Organic Preppers.<br /> This is the fascinating story of Daisy Luther from the blogs The Organic Prepper and DaisyLuther.com. I think you'll really enjoy the story of the winding path that led Daisy to homesteading and outspoken preparedness.<br /> <br /> A series of family tragedies, job losses and hardships drove her deep into the wilderness to homeschool her children, and learn that homesteading isn't as easy as it first seems.<br /> <br /> Her experiences reignited the skeptical, always questioning persona of her youth and inspired her to take up writing. She wrote books and multiple blogs centered on prepping, preparedness and delivering the truth in an unabashed way that you never see in mainstream media.<br /> <br /> Daisy shares her thoughts on homeschooling, homesteading, online courses, self-sufficient income, prepping, preparedness and much more. So grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:00:47 Kendra Lynne | New Life on a Homestead | Canning | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-6-kendra-lynne-new-life-homestead-canning-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 07 Oct 2016 13:23:24 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2560 We all love our children, but what do you do when that cute little girl of yours grows up to be a defiant teenage trouble maker? Today, I’ll share the story of how a rebellious teenager in a gang-infested neighborhood escaped to develop a new life on a homestead. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 6! Raising a teenager is challenging—always has been. But imagine you’re raising one in a busy California coastal town—say—Santa Barbara. It’s 1996 and the city is besieged by violence. The police have their hands full with over 800 gang members, creating a steady stream of mischief. And there’s been an increasing trend in real violence. Drive-by shootings, gang rapes, brawls, stabbings, And here you are, a single mom trying to raise a 15-year old by yourself. So, what do you do with your rebellious daughter? You stick her on a plane and sentence her to a new life on a homestead. This is the inspiring story of Kendra Lynne from the blog New Life on a Homestead. Grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Small Farm Nation Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Resources Relevant to This Episode Kendra's Blog - New Life on a Homestead Kendra's Canning DVD - At Home Canning for Beginners and Beyond All American 921 Pressure Canner Start Prepping by Tim Young How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix We all love our children, but what do you do when that cute little girl of yours grows up to be a defiant teenage trouble maker? Today, I’ll share the story of how a rebellious teenager in a gang-infested neighborhood escaped to develop a new life on... smallfarmnation.com <br /> We all love our children, but what do you do when that cute little girl of yours grows up to be a defiant teenage trouble maker?<br /> <br /> Today, I’ll share the story of how a rebellious teenager in a gang-infested neighborhood escaped to develop a new life on a homestead.<br /> Raising a teenager is challenging—always has been. But imagine you’re raising one in a busy California coastal town—say—Santa Barbara.<br /> <br /> It’s 1996 and the city is besieged by violence. The police have their hands full with over 800 gang members, creating a steady stream of mischief.<br /> <br /> And there’s been an increasing trend in real violence. Drive-by shootings, gang rapes, brawls, stabbings,<br /> <br /> And here you are, a single mom trying to raise a 15-year old by yourself.<br /> <br /> So, what do you do with your rebellious daughter?<br /> <br /> You stick her on a plane and sentence her to a new life on a homestead.<br /> <br /> This is the inspiring story of Kendra Lynne from the blog New Life on a Homestead.<br /> <br /> Grab some coffee and pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 1:02:56 Mark Goodwin | Prepper | Christian Authorhttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-5-mark-goodwin-prepper-christian-author-podcast/ Fri, 30 Sep 2016 13:21:18 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2557 Some men get trapped in the purple haze of life, only to see the light when God himself answers their prayers from the county jail. This week, I share the story of one such man. A man who kicked his drug addiction to become a prepper and bestselling author of post-apocalyptic Christian novels. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Welcome to Episode 5. Kentucky is the bourbon capital of the world. It's also where Mark Goodwin grew up and where he learned practical preparedness from the best--The Boy Scouts. But he wasn't prepared for life's temptations after he got out of school. He made great money working bars and restaurants, but spent every nickel on partying. He may still be doing that today, but he received two loud and clear messages from above that forever changed his path in life. Today, Mark is the host of the Prepper Recon podcast, and is a bestselling author of post-apocalyptic Christian novels. We discuss everything from prepping, preparedness and overcoming addiction to making money as a Kindle books author and modern homesteading. It's a great, inspiring episode. So pull up a chair! Subscribe to the Self-Sufficient Life Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates!   Resources Relevant to This Episode Mark's Podcast - Prepper Recon Mark's Post-Apocalypitic Novels Start Prepping by Tim Young How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Some men get trapped in the purple haze of life, only to see the light when God himself answers their prayers from the county jail. This week, I share the story of one such man. A man who kicked his drug addiction to become a prepper and bestselling au... smallfarmnation.com <br /> Some men get trapped in the purple haze of life, only to see the light when God himself answers their prayers from the county jail. This week, I share the story of one such man. A man who kicked his drug addiction to become a prepper and bestselling author of post-apocalyptic Christian novels.<br /> <br /> Kentucky is the bourbon capital of the world. It's also where Mark Goodwin grew up and where he learned practical preparedness from the best--The Boy Scouts.<br /> <br /> But he wasn't prepared for life's temptations after he got out of school. He made great money working bars and restaurants, but spent every nickel on partying. He may still be doing that today, but he received two loud and clear messages from above that forever changed his path in life.<br /> <br /> Today, Mark is the host of the Prepper Recon podcast, and is a bestselling author of post-apocalyptic Christian novels. We discuss everything from prepping, preparedness and overcoming addiction to making money as a Kindle books author and modern homesteading.<br /> <br /> It's a great, inspiring episode. So pull up a chair! Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 49:51 Jill Winger | Essential Oils | Prairie Homestead | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-4-jill-winger-essential-oils-prairie-homestead-homesteading-podcast/ Fri, 23 Sep 2016 13:20:15 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2555 Welcome to Episode 4.  In this episode, you'll hear the story of a little girl who pushed her city wheelbarrow to the life in the country she was destined for. Little kids dream of becoming all kinds of things when they grow up, but usually outgrow their fantasies when they become adults. But every now and then a kid holds on tight and grows up to live her dream. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES Jill Winger grew up in the city. But from her earliest memory she fantasized about living in the country. So when she turned 18, she fled and began pushing her childhood wheelbarrow to rural Wyoming. Today she's a successful modern homesteader, earning enough money through blogging and her essential oils business to pay herself and her husband. Jill offers great advice on how to start and monetize a blog, building an essential oils business, the value of frugality, following Dave Ramsey and avoiding debt and so much more. It's a great listen to anyone inspiring to be more self-sufficient. Keep up with Jill at The Prairie Homestead. Subscribe to the Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode:   Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates!   Resources Relevant to This Episode Jill's Blog - The Prairie Homestead Jill's Book: Your Custom Homestead Jill's Book: Natural Homestead: 40+ Recipes for Natural Critters & Crops Book: Best Essential Oils Guide How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Welcome to Episode 4.  In this episode, you'll hear the story of a little girl who pushed her city wheelbarrow to the life in the country she was destined for. Little kids dream of becoming all kinds of things when they grow up, smallfarmnation.com <br /> In this episode, you'll hear the story of a little girl who pushed her city wheelbarrow to the life in the country she was destined for.<br /> <br /> Little kids dream of becoming all kinds of things when they grow up, but usually outgrow their fantasies when they become adults. But every now and then a kid holds on tight and grows up to live her dream. Jill Winger grew up in the city. But from her earliest memory she fantasized about living in the country. So when she turned 18, she fled and began pushing her childhood wheelbarrow to rural Wyoming.<br /> <br /> Today she's a successful modern homesteader, earning enough money through blogging and her essential oils business to pay herself and her husband.<br /> <br /> Jill offers great advice on how to start and monetize a blog, building an essential oils business, the value of frugality, following Dave Ramsey and avoiding debt and so much more. It's a great listen to anyone inspiring to be more self-sufficient.<br /> <br /> Keep up with Jill at The Prairie Homestead.<br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 53:29 Patrice Lewis | Rural Revolution | Woodcraft Entrepreneur | Homesteadinghttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-3-patrice-lewis-rural-revolution-woodcraft-entrepreneur-homesteading-podcast/ Thu, 15 Sep 2016 13:18:21 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2552 Welcome to Episode 3. In this episode, you'll hear the story of how a monster traffic jam in Sacramento sparked a rural revolution in Idaho. Patrice Lewis sat in a monster Sacramento traffic jam and reached her tipping point. Patrice was a project coordinator for an agricultural research firm in Sacramento.Her husband, Don, was a geologist with a geo-engineering firm. They entered their respective fields because they loved the outdoors.But, as they sat in traffic with the heat waves rising from the asphalt, they realized the truth.They rarely got to be outdoors. It had begun to gnaw at them. The commute. The flickering fluorescent lights. The cubicles. And the crowds. They reached the tipping point--and fled. First to Oregon, but later deeper into the wilderness to an Idaho homestead. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES When they fled they were young, idealistic newlyweds. But they were also broke, and with no jobs available where they moved, they had to learn to take care of themselves. Patrice and Don mastered the "Three H's" of self-sufficiency: homeschooling, homesteading and home-based business. Their woodcraft business (they make medieval wooden tankards) has now sustained them for over two decades. But Patrice and Don also mastered the concept of multiple-streams of income, and earn money freelance writing, selling grassfed beef and other ways. Keep up with their journey on Patrice's blog, rural-revolution.com. Subscribe to the Podcast Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates! Read the Transcript You can read a complete, word-for-word transcript of this episode here. Resources Relevant to This Episode Rural-Revolution Blog The Simplicity Primer by Patrice Lewis Rural-Revolution's Country Living Series of Books Making Soap From Scratch: How to Make Handmade Soap-A Beginner's Guide How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Theme Song - Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Welcome to Episode 3. In this episode, you'll hear the story of how a monster traffic jam in Sacramento sparked a rural revolution in Idaho. Patrice Lewis sat in a monster Sacramento traffic jam and reached her tipping point. smallfarmnation.com<br /> In this episode, you'll hear the story of how a monster traffic jam in Sacramento sparked a rural revolution in Idaho.<br /> <br /> Patrice Lewis sat in a monster Sacramento traffic jam and reached her tipping point. Patrice was a project coordinator for an agricultural research firm in Sacramento.Her husband, Don, was a geologist with a geo-engineering firm.<br /> <br /> They entered their respective fields because they loved the outdoors.But, as they sat in traffic with the heat waves rising from the asphalt, they realized the truth.They rarely got to be outdoors.<br /> <br /> It had begun to gnaw at them. The commute. The flickering fluorescent lights. The cubicles. And the crowds.<br /> <br /> They reached the tipping point--and fled. First to Oregon, but later deeper into the wilderness to an Idaho homestead.<br /> <br /> When they fled they were young, idealistic newlyweds. But they were also broke, and with no jobs available where they moved, they had to learn to take care of themselves.<br /> <br /> Patrice and Don mastered the "Three H's" of self-sufficiency: homeschooling, homesteading and home-based business.<br /> <br /> Their woodcraft business (they make medieval wooden tankards) has now sustained them for over two decades. But Patrice and Don also mastered the concept of multiple-streams of income, and earn money freelance writing, selling grassfed beef and other ways.<br /> <br /> Keep up with their journey on Patrice's blog, rural-revolution.com.<br /> <br /> Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 51:57 Season 1: Episode 2: $250K/Yr Blogging | Lisa Steele | Backyard Chickenshttps://smallfarmnation.com/season-1-episode-2-250kyr-blogging-lisa-steele-backyard-chickens-podcast/ Wed, 14 Sep 2016 13:16:41 +0000 https://smallfarmnation.com/?p=2549 Welcome to Episode 2. In this episode, you’ll hear the story of how Lisa Steele escaped the concrete jungle surrounding Wall Street and built a lucrative brand around backyard chickens. Lisa Steele made Gordon Gecko proud, living the high-life on Wall Street during the go-go '80s. But when terrorists bombed the World Trade Center for the first time in 1993, Lisa reached her tipping point and began looking for a simpler life. It was many years later when boredom and necessity motivated her to start writing about her passion; chickens. Listen to the Podcast SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST IN ITUNES What started as a simple Facebook page grew into a thriving blog, books and television series, all centered around Lisa's brand, Fresh Eggs Daily. A lot of people start blogs, but few turn their passion into a blogging business. Lisa Steele did just that, and now earns an income to rival what she walked away from when she left Wall Street. Lisa teaches us how giving readers what they want can earn you more than chicken feed. Subscribe Make it easy on yourself and subscribe to the show, and you’ll never miss an episode: Thanks for Listening! Thanks so much for joining me this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please SHARE it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and I greatly appreciate it! Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates!   Resources Relevant to This Episode In this episode we mentioned the following resources: Fresh Eggs Daily - Website Gardening with Chickens by Lisa Steele - the book Fresh Eggs Daily by Lisa Steele - the book Duck Eggs Daily by Lisa Steele - the book Lisa's Televesion Series: Fresh Eggs Daily How to Make Money Homesteading by Tim Young The Accidental Farmers by Tim Young Start Prepping by Tim Young Production Credits Story written by Tim Young Music Credits Opting Out Today - Lyrics by Tim Young Other royalty-free music by www.bensound.com, Kevin MacLeod, Nicolai Heidlas & Audionautix Welcome to Episode 2. In this episode, you’ll hear the story of how Lisa Steele escaped the concrete jungle surrounding Wall Street and built a lucrative brand around backyard chickens. - Lisa Steele made Gordon Gecko proud, smallfarmnation.com<br /> In this episode, you’ll hear the story of how Lisa Steele escaped the concrete jungle surrounding Wall Street and built a lucrative brand around backyard chickens.<br /> <br /> Lisa Steele made Gordon Gecko proud, living the high-life on Wall Street during the go-go '80s. But when terrorists bombed the World Trade Center for the first time in 1993, Lisa reached her tipping point and began looking for a simpler life. It was many years later when boredom and necessity motivated her to start writing about her passion; chickens.<br /> <br /> What started as a simple Facebook page grew into a thriving blog, books and television series, all centered around Lisa's brand, Fresh Eggs Daily.<br /> <br /> A lot of people start blogs, but few turn their passion into a blogging business. Lisa Steele did just that, and now earns an income to rival what she walked away from when she left Wall Street.<br /> <br /> Lisa teaches us how giving readers what they want can earn you more than chicken feed. Tim Young: SmallFarmNation.com clean 59:28